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COLUMBIA 
UNIVERSITY 



HEALTH SCIENCES 
LIBRARY 




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Columbia Universitj in the City of New York 



School of 
Dental 



Oral Sun 



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19J1-19J2 



The Faculty of Dental 
and Oral Surgery 



William J. McGill, Ph.D., LL.D., L.H.D. President of the University 

Wm. Theodore de Bary, Ph.D., D.Litt. Executive Vice President for Academic 

Affairs and Provost of the University 
Paul A. Marks, M.D. Vice President in Charge of Medical Affairs 
Melvin L. Moss, D.D.S., Ph.D. Dean 
Herbert J. Bartelstone, D.D.S., Ph.D. Associate Dean 
George L. O'Grady, D.D.S. Assistant Dean 
Stephen Wotman, D.D.S. Special Assistant to the Dean 



Harold L. Applewhite, D.D.S., M.P.H. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Howard A. Arden, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Herbert D. Ayers, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Sam M. Beiser, Ph.D. Professor of Microbiology and Professor of Oral Biology 

Frank E. Beube, L.D.S., D.D.S. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

Edward A. Cain, Jr., D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

Victor S. Caronia, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Erwin Chargaff, Ph.D. Professor of Biochemistry 

Joseph A. Cuttita, D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

Edward W. Dempsey, Ph.D. Professor of Anatomy 

Nicholas A. Di Salvo, D.D.S., Ph.D. Professor of Dentistry 

Robert Gottsegen, D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

Brian F. Hoffman, M.D. David Hosack Professor of Pharmacology 

Sidney L. Horowitz, D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

Donald W. King, M.D. Francis Delafield Professor of Pathology 

Austin H. Kutscher, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Joseph M. Leavitt, D.D.S. Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

John J. Lucca, D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

Patricia A. McLean, M.A. Associate Professor of Dental Hygiene 

Irwin D. Mandel, D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

Henry I. Nahoum, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Thomas W. Portway, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Harry M. Rose, M.D. John E. Borne Professor of Medical and Surgical Research 

Solomon N. Rosenstein, D.D.S. Professor of Dentistry 

John V. Taggart, M.D. Professor of Physiology 

Ennio L. Uccellani, D.D.S. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

Edward V. Zegarelli, D.D.S., M.S. Edwin S. Robinson Professor of Dentistry 



COMMITTEES 



COMMITTEES 

ADMISSIONS 

( UNDERGRADUATE ) 

ADMISSIONS 

(DENTAL hygiene) 

admissions 

(postgraduate) 

executive 



INSTRUCTION 



FIRST- YEAR CLASS 



SECOND- YEAR CLASS 



TmRD-YEAR CLASS 



FOURTH- YEAR CLASS 



DENTAL HYGIENE 



POSTGRADUATE 



INSTRUMENT 



TEACHING 



Professors Cuttita (chairman); Anderson, Bartelstone, 
Dworkin, Miller, Nahoum, and Naidorf; Dean Moss 
(ex officio) 

Professors McLean (chairman); Cuttita, and Wehrle; Dean 
Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Gottsegen (chairman); Bartelstone, Cuttita, 
DiSalvo, Leavitt, Lucca, Rosenstein, and Zegarelli; Dean 
Moss (ex officio) 

Dean Moss (chairman) ; Professors Applewhite, Bartelstone, 
Beiser, Cain, DiSalvo, Gottsegen, Horowitz, Leavitt, Lucca, 
McLean, Mandel, Rosenstein, and Zegarelli; Assistant Dean 
O'Grady 

Professors Mandel (chairman); Applewhite, Bartelstone, 
Beiser, Cain, Dempsey, DiSalvo, Dworkin, Gottsegen, Horo- 
witz, Kahn, Kaplan, King, Leavitt, Lucca, Noback, Nocenti, 
Rose, Rosenstein, Salentijn, and Zegarelli; Assistant Dean 
O'Grady; Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Beiser (chairman); Eisenberg, Jenkins, King, 
Mandel, Noback, and Nocenti; Assistant Dean O'Grady; 
Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Cain (chairman); Applewhite, Bartelstone, 
Beiser, Blake, Budowsky, Caronia, Gottsegen, Horowitz, 
Kahn, King, Mandel, and Salentijn; Assistant Dean 
O'Grady; Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Lucca (chairman); Bartelstone, Cain, Caronia, 
Horn, Nahoum, Schwartz, and Zegarelli; Assistant Dean 
O'Grady; Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Zegarelli (chairman); Applewhite, Bartelstone, 
Cain, Caronia, DiSalvo, Johnson, Lucca, and Rosenstein; 
Assistant Dean O'Grady; Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors McLean (chairman); Applewhite, Bartelstone, 
Cuttita, DiSalvo, Gottsegen, Kaplan, Uccellani, Wehrle, and 
Zegarelli; Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Gottsegen (chairman); Bartelstone, Cuttita, 
DiSalvo, Leavitt, Lucca, Person, Rosenstein, and Zegarelli; 
Assistant Dean O'Grady; Dean Moss (ex officio) 

Professors Uccellani (chairman) ; Lucca, Nahoum, Portway, 
and Rosenstein; Mr. McGrath; Assistant Dean O'Grady. 

Professors Bartelstone (chairman); Cain, DiSalvo, Horo- 
witz, and Lucca; Dean Moss (ex officio) 



4 SENATE DELEGATES • ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF • OFFICERS EMERITI 

IN-SERVICE TRAINING Profcssors Caronia (chairman); Bartelstone, Cain, Gottse- 
gen, Horowitz, Lucca, Rosenstein, Uccellani, and Zegarelli 

coNTiNxnNG Professors Gottsegen (chairman); DiSalvo, Horowitz, 

EDUCATION Leavitt, Lucca, L D. Mandel, and Zegarelli; Dean Moss 

(ex officio) 

SCHEDULING Professors Cain (chairman); Horn and Koch 

DELEGATES TO THE UNIVERSITY SENATE 

Edward A. Cain, Jr. Morton C. Rennert 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF 

Kathrine L. Brown. Administrative Assistant 

Eileen H. Daly. Assistant to the Registrar of the University 

Ann M. Emmerich. Assistant to the Dean 

Thomas P. Fleming, M.S. Head, Medical Sciences Division Libraries 

Gertrude Levin. Executive Secretary 

Michael J. McGrath. Manager of Dental Stores 

OFFICERS EMERITI 

Houghton Holliday. Professor Emeritus of Dentistry 

Carl R. Oman. Professor Emeritus of Dentistry 

Gilbert P. Smith. Professor Emeritus of Dentistry; Dean Emeritus 

Frances A. Stoll. Professor Emeritus of Dental Hygiene 



Objectives of the School 

The School of Dental and Oral Surgery of Columbia University can trace its 
origins to the year 1852, when the New York State Legislature chartered the New 
York College of Dental Surgery. The College became part of Columbia University 
in 1916 when it was recognized that dentistry is an integral part of the health 
sciences and that dental education is a true university discipline. The program of 
the School was established on this basis. Many departments of the University con- 
tribute to and collaborate on the education of the dental student, thereby assuring 
him a broad foundation for sound professional development. As the guiding 
educational policy of Columbia University is a constant pursuit of excellence, 
the primary goal of the School of Dental and Oral Surgery is the preparation of 
dentists who will fulfill their obligations to the individual, to society, and to the 
profession. The dental education policy at Columbia has in the past provided 
leadership in the maturation of dentistry in the United States. Two examples of 
such leadership are (1) the establishment at Columbia University in 1920 of the 
first organization devoted exclusively to research in dentistry, and (2) Professor 
William J. Geis' preparation of a major critique of dental education in the United 
States in 1926 which resulted in the acceptance by dental schools throughout the 
country of the basic policies and objectives developed at Columbia. 

The University, realizing the need for even greater emphasis on the prevention 
of dental disease, is again revising the dental curriculum. The new curriculum is 
designed to increase the student's appreciation of the conceptual basis of dentistry. 
Adequate preparation for dentistry demands an understanding of broad biological 
principles integrated with the continually evolving body of scientific information 
in clinical dentistry and basic dental research. Building on this base, the student 
is exposed to the full spectrum of dental problems as a directed observer, and is 
then introduced to those surgical and manipulative procedures and methods of 
diagnosis and prevention which he must learn to perform with a high degree of 
competence. Emphasis is on the close relationship between systemic and oral 
health and disease, on systemic aberrations that affect the oral structures, on 
diseases of the mouth which may affect other organ systems, and on dental health 
as an essential to total health. 

Clinical training is broad in scope. It is designed to produce competence in the 
recognition of oral disease and disorder, to stress the essential role of prevention 
in the control of oral disease, to establish the concept of maintaining the oral 
structures in optimal health, and to develop skill in planning and execution of 
treatment. 

It is necessary that the dental curriculum be considered only the initial 
framework for the student's lifetime participation in dental science and art. To 
this end, the curriculum must cultivate in the student those habits of independent 
thought and scholarship that encourage the continual evaluation of new knowl- 
edge. Although learning plays a vital role in the student's life, his future develop- 
ment and attainment can be assured most effectively by fostering a spirit of 



6 OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL 

inquiry. Accordingly, there is constant application of the scientific method, and 
both undergraduate and postgraduate students are encouraged to participate in 
research. 

Because the population is rapidly increasing, knowledge of the processes of 
human growth and development and of prevention of disease and abnormality 
must be amplified. In medicine, prevention of disease has resulted in extensive 
reduction in infant and child mortality and in a marked increase in the life span 
of the individual. In dentistry, prevention of dental and oral disease and disorder 
must be effected in childhood to enable our youth to reach adulthood with com- 
plete, healthy dentitions and socially acceptable speech and expression. The in- 
creased life span presents many new physiological, pathological, and psychological 
problems which are peculiar to the aged and are open to investigation. In addition 
to undergraduate education, programs in graduate education and research are 
essential if we are to meet these challenges to dentistry. The School of Dental 
and Oral Surgery regards high standards in both graduate education and research 
as prime objectives which follow directly from its objectives in undergraduate 
education. 

Foresight on the part of the founders of the School of Dental and Oral Surgery 
has provided for the education of auxiliary personnel to augment dental health 
services. The program of Courses for Dental Hygienists was established in the 
same year that the School became part of the University. A formal dental 
auxiliary utilization program is functioning at the School. It is designed to train 
auxiliary personnel and dental students in the efficient use of auxiliaries. This 
program also explores new opportunities for the use of auxiliary personnel in an 
attempt to provide additional services to meet the expanding dental health needs 
of a growing population. 

The University has realized that to accomplish these objectives requires the 
selection of students with superior abilities and academic qualifications, acquisition 
and maintenance of an excellent staff, and constant pursuit of knowledge through 
an active and diversified research program. Conscious of these needs, the School 
selects its students with care and maintains small classes, with a favorable ratio 
of staff to students. This permits individual instruction and a stimulating relation- 
ship between student and instructor. The School has, through the years, had a 
distinguished staff which has demonstrated accomplishment in education, research, 
and professional leadership. A number of significant additions to the staff were 
made during 1969 and 1970. The renovation of clinical facilities was completed 
in 1969. Over the next four years there is to be a further expansion in full-time 
staff and planning for an entirely new physical facility on the Medical Center 
campus. The new curriculum, the expanded staff, and the new building assure 
the continued leadership of the University in dental education and research 
and increase its ability to prepare students to meet the expanding professional 
responsibilities of dentistry. 



► THE PROGRAM OF STUDY 

September 1969 marked the inauguration of an exciting new curriculum at the 
School. All of the basic science courses are being offered to both dental and 



OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL 7 

medical students in the form of a "core" program. During the first year the 
dental student takes all the basic science subjects except pharmacology (second 
year, first trimester). Also in the first year the dental student is required to take 
three new courses (1) Introduction to Dentistry, 100, in which he is exposed to the 
nature of dentistry and its significance, the means of delivery of dental care, and 
the kinds of preventive and treatment services which modern dentistry provides; 
(2) an interdisciplinary course in human behavior which deals with the psycho- 
logical aspects of patient care; and (3) a series of correlation clinics consisting 
of lectures and demonstrations designed to integrate medical and dental clinical 
subjects with the basic sciences. 

Under the new curriculum, the second year is essentially a "core" dental-science 
year, providing the full range of courses in oral biology as well as the conceptual 
basis for the application of modern methods in the recognition, prevention, and 
treatment of dental disorders. Clinical observation, small group teaching, and fre- 
quent seminars provide the second-year student with a comprehensive view of 
dentistry. The new program also includes an integrated course in dentistry (recog- 
nition, prevention, concepts of therapy, instrumentation, and clinical observation) 
as well as a course in psychosocial aspects of dentistry. 

In the new curriculum, the third year is to be primarily clinical, with training 
in all phases of dentistry. Emphasis is to be on correlation of the various dental 
disciplines with each other and with the basic sciences. Prevention and compre- 
hensive treatment are to be stressed while technical laboratory procedures are to 
be limited. Third-year students are to function as student preceptors for second- 
year students and conduct or participate in seminars on clinical subjects with 
second- and fourth-year students and staff. In 1970-1971, as many aspects of 
this program as possible are to be introduced to the present third-year class. 

During the fourth year under the new curriculum, the opportunity to choose 
electives in special areas of dentistry is to be made available, and over the next few 
years an increasing number of electives are to be designed and offered. In order to 
increase their ability to view clinical cases in a comprehensive manner, fourth- 
year students are to spend time as student preceptors in the clinic and in seminars 
held in conjunction with underclassmen and the staff. 

Because of the constantly expanding body of knowledge in basic and dental 
sciences and the need for adequate clinic time, it is anticipated that two summer 
sessions are to be required: (1) between the second and third years (starting in 
1971); (2) between the third and fourth years (now in effect). These sessions 
are to be held during June and July for approximately eight to nine weeks. 

Throughout the entire course an effort is made to interrelate the different phases 
of dental learning by means of "correlative" and "combined" clinics in which the 
various departments and divisions cooperate in the discussion and demonstration 
of the same and related problems and thus treat the study of dentistry as a unit 
rather than a series of isolated branches of learning. At the same time an attempt 
is made to individualize instruction and to place responsibility as far as practicable 
upon the student for his own training. This is accomplished by the division of 
classes into small sections, by conferences, and by the comprehensive case method 
of instruction. 

The student's voluntary participation in research projects of his own choosing 
and in programs under the guidance of the faculty is earnestly encouraged. Mem- 



8 OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL 

bers of the William Jarvie Society for Dental Research, the undergraduate research 
and honor society, undertake individual and team projects under the direction of 
members of the faculty. Lectures on the principles and practice of research are 
provided for the membership. In addition, students assist in the execution of studies 
being pursued by faculty members. A limited number of student research fellow- 
ships are available for summer work under the direction of the staff. The scope of 
student research includes critical reviews of the literature, clinical studies in the 
techniques of the various disciplines of dentistry, and the evaluation of newer 
therapeutic agents and dental materials. Work in the basic sciences is encouraged. 
The administrative offices and the clinical and research facilities of the School of 
Dental and Oral Surgery occupy three floors of the Vanderbilt Clinic wing of the 
Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, one of the great institutions of its kind in 
the East. In addition to research facilities in basic science departments in the 
College of Physicians and Surgeons, the School has research laboratories in two 
nearby buildings. 

THE DENTAL CLINIC 

The School benefits in many ways by its association with the Medical Center. 
One of the functions of its clinic is the dental care of patients in the Center's hospi- 
tals. Dental students are given a unique opportunity to gain experience in the diag- 
nosis and care of those cases where a relationship exists between oral and general 
systemic diseases. The student also learns at first hand the problems of providing 
dental care for the hospitalized patient. The wards and outpatient departments of 
the Center give close contact and association with all branches of the health services. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Medical Library occupies parts of the three lower floors in the College build- 
ing. It provides current literature, both books and journals, for faculty and students, 
and it aids in research through its own collection of current and historical works 
and through its unique bibliographic service. 

The library contains approximately 295,000 volumes of books and journals, 
some 5,000 pamphlets, and about 2,000 slides on the history of medicine. More 
than 4,500 periodicals are received regularly. A professional library staff is avail- 
able to aid students, faculty, and research workers in medicine, dentistry, nursing, 
public health, and the hospitals of the Medical Center. 

The libraries on the Morningside campus, which contain over 4,000,000 books, 
periodicals, and documents, are open to all students. The main collection is housed 
in Butler Library, while special departmental collections are located in various 
other buildings on the campus. They include collections on biology, chemistry, 
psychology, sociology, and other subjects related to dentistry and supplement the 
special collections available in the Medical Library. Books may be borrowed for 
home use. 

The Medical Library is open Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; 
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 12 noon to 10 p.m., during the academic 
year. All other libraries post their hours. 



OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL 



► POSTGRADUATE TRAINING 

The School of Dental and Oral Surgery arranges courses in the various areas of 
dentistry to meet the needs of practitioners. In 1971 short refresher courses 
will be offered in various subjects. Admission requirements include graduation from 
an approved dental school and licensure to practice dentistry within the United 
States or a foreign country. There is no degree or certificate offered for these courses. 

The School is also authorized to grant certificates of training in special branches 
of dentistry. Study for the certificate of training includes special work in the clinical 
and basic-science branches of dentistry approved by the Dean. At present, programs 
are offered to qualify graduates in dentistry who wish to prepare for specialization 
in endodontics, orthodontics, pedodontics, and periodontology. 

For further information see the bulletin of Postgraduate Courses for Dentists, 
which may be obtained from the Admissions Office, School of Dental and Oral 
Surgery. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN THE BASIC SCIENCES 

A limited number of fellowships are available to graduates of accredited dental 
schools. These fellowships offer opportunity for study in the following basic-science 
departments of the University: anatomy, biochemistry, microbiology, pathology, 
pharmacology, and physiology. For further information, address the Dean, School 
of Dental and Oral Surgery. 

COURSES LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Graduation from accredited dental schools under the present curriculum of four 
academic years preceded by three acceptable predental college years is considered 
by the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences of Columbia University to meet the 
general requirement for admission. There are additional admission requirements in 
certain departments. A student who is accepted by the Graduate School as a candi- 
date for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and who holds the Doctor of Dental 
Surgery degree from Columbia University may, with the consent of the Dean, offer 
the work done for the professional degree in lieu of points toward the fulfillment of 
the residence requirement for the degree. For further information see the bulletin of 
the Graduate Faculties, which may be obtained by writing to the Graduate School 
of Arts and Sciences Office of Admissions and Financial Aid, 106 Low Memorial 
Library, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027. 

PUBLIC HEALTH FOR DENTISTS 

A one-year course leading to a Master of Public Health degree is offered by the 
School of Public Health. The course is open to graduate dentists. For further in- 
formation regarding course content, registration, and fees, apply to the Director, 
School of Public Health and Administrative Medicine, 600 West 168th Street, New 
York, N.Y. 10032. 



10 OBJECTIVES OF THE SCHOOL 

► COURSES FOR DENTAL HYGIENISTS 

Columbia offers a bachelor's and a master's degree in dental hygiene. Candi- 
dates for the Bachelor of Science degree are admitted only in September under 
one of two classifications: Program A, for the student with two years of liberal 
arts college credit; Program B, for the student with two years of dental hygiene 
college credit. Candidates for the Master of Science degree are admitted in Feb- 
ruary or September. The program for the M.S. degree provides advanced educa- 
tion in dental hygiene administration, research, and teaching. 

For further information address inquiries to the Director, Courses for Dental 
Hygienists, 630 West 168th Street, New York, N.Y. 10032. 



Courses of Instruction 



The University reserves the right to withdraw or modify the courses of instruction 
or to change the instructors at any time. As indicated in the Objectives and Pro- 
gram of Study, the curriculum is undergoing extensive revision. Announcements 
concerning course titles, content, and staffing of a number of new courses will 
be made prior to the start of the 1971-1972 academic year. 

ANATOMY 

Anatomy 115. Oral microscopic anatomy and embryology 

Professor Salentijn and the staff. Second year. 

This course is the same as Oral Biology 200. 

Lectures, conferences, and laboratory on the detailed microscopic anatomy and development of the 

dental and associated orofacial structures. 

Anatomy 150. Microscopic anatomy 

Professor Dempsey and the staff. First year. 

Lectures, conferences, and laboratory. 

This course is the same as Anatomy lOlF in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. 

Anatomy 151. Gross anatomy and embryology 

The staff. First year. 

Regional dissections of the complete body, augmented by lectures stressing functional interpretations. 
Lectures correlate developmental anatomy with gross anatomy. 

Anatomy 153. Nervous system 

Professors Carpenter and Noback and assistants. First year. 

Lectures and demonstrations on the gross anatomy, structure, and functions of the central nervous 
system. 

Anatomy 352. Functional anatomy of the head and neck 

Professor Crikelair and the staff. Third year. 

A concise revievi' of the functional interrelationships in this region and their dynamic significance. 
Pertinent clinical topics are analyzed from this vievi'point. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 
Biochemistry 150. Principles of biochemistry 

The staff. First year. 

A survey of the chemical constituents of the mammalian cell and their metabolic activities; energy 
production in the cell, and its role in the synthesis of biological macromolecules; biosynthesis of 
nucleic acids and proteins; regulation of nucleic acid and protein synthesis. 

INTERDISCIPLINARY CORRELATION COURSES 

Correlation Clinics 100. 

Professors Taggart and Herter. First year. 

A series of clinics illustrating the application of basic science to the understanding of disease 
mechanisms. 



12 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Introduction to Dentistry 100. 

Professor Bartelstone and the staff. First year. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and periods of clinical observation designed to define the scope of dentistry 
early in the career of the dental student. Correlation between the preclinical and clinical disciplines is 
an integral part of the course content. 

Introduction to Dentistry 200. 

Professor Bartelstone and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and clinical observation designed to permit the second-year student to 
experience the newly developing curriculum as early as possible. It begins to supply the background 
he needs to utilize fully the modifications in emphasis and course content in his ensuing clinical 
training. 

Dental Materials 327. Physical properties of dental materials 

Professor Ayers. Third year. 

Lectures and demonstrations relating the properties and functions of the restorative and accessory 
dental materials with the oral tissues. This is supplemented by correlated instruction in the various 
clinical disciplines during the second, third, and fourth years. 

Comprehensive Case 485. Comprehensive case 

The staff. Fourth year. 

Each student is assigned a case for which he performs all the dental services: taking of x-ray negatives, 
treatment planning, surgery, and reparative and restorative procedures. The services are carried out 
in the various clinical divisions. The oral examination accompanying the inspection of the completed 
case aims to correlate the teaching of the entire course. 

Temporomandibular Joint Disorders 484. * 

The staff. Fourth year. 

Lectures, clinical demonstrations, and conferences on the principles of the diagnosis and treatment of 
disorders of the temporomandibular joints. 

ENDODONTICS 

Endodontics 232. Endodontics theory and technique 

Professors Leavitt, Naidorf, Moreinis, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars on the fundamentals of endodontics. Demonstrations and exercises in endo- 
dontic technique on extracted teeth. 

Endodontics 335. Basic clinical endodontics 

Professor Goodman and the staff. Third year. 

Demonstrations and clinical experience in the practice of endodontics on selected single-rooted teeth. 

Endodontics 436. Advanced clinical endodontics 

Professor Leavitt and the staff. Fourth year. 

Lectures and clinical experience in more advanced problems in endodontics. 

MEDICINE 

Medicine 378. General survey of medicine 

Professor Cosgriff and the staff. Third year. 

The important aspects of internal medicine, with reference to fundamentals as well as recent diag- 
nostic and therapeutic advances. Particular emphasis on over-all medical problems and their implica- 
tions for dentistry. 

MICROBIOLOGY 

Microbiology 151. General medical microbiology and immunology 

The staff. First year. 

Laboratory and conferences. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 13 

Microbiology 152. Principles of microbiology, immunology, and epidemiology 

The staff. First year. 

This course is similar to Microbiology 105F in the College of Physicians and Surgeons. Lectures on 
oral microbiology are substituted for several of those of the medical series. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

Operative Dentistry 231. Elements of operative dentistry 

Professor Portway and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and laboratory exercises on the fundamentals of operative dentistry, including the etiology 
of dental caries and the biological approach to the technical procedures in the restoration of teeth. 
Periods of clinical observation are an integral part of the course. 

Operative Dentistry 333. Operative clinical practice 

Professor Cain and the staff. Third year 

Introduction to the clinical practice of operative dentistry. Lectures, demonstrations, and clinical 
experience in the recognition of disease and related conditions. Prevention, treatment planning, and 
restoration to form and function. 

Operative Dentistry 434. Advanced clinical practice 

Professor Cain and the staff. Fourth year. 

A continuation of Operative Dentistry 333, with the addition of seminars in the special problems of 
operative dentistry. 

ORAL BIOLOGY 

DEVELOPMENT AND FUNCTION 

A correlated, interdisciplinary series of courses. 

Oral Biology 200. Oral microscopic anatomy and embryology 

Professor Salentijn and the staff. Second year. 

This course is the same as Anatomy 115. 
Lectures, conferences, and laboratory. 

Oral Biology 201. Oral anatomy and occlusion 

Professors Arden, Horowitz, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures, seminars, and laboratory sessions in oral anatomy. Dental morphology and evolution and 
theories of occlusion. A joint course of the divisions of orofacial development and oral biology. 

Oral Biology 202. Growth and development 

Professor Horowitz and the staff. 

Lectures in the development of the dentition including embroyo-genesis, timing and sequence of calcifi- 
cation and eruption, development of occlusion, and changes in the dentition with age. A joint course 
of the divisions of orofacial development and oral biology. 

BIOLOGY OF THE ORAL TISSUES 

Oral Biology 210. Oral biochemistry 

Professors Smith and Persons. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars on the biochemical nature of the oral tissues and their metabolic activities. 

Oral Biology 211. Oral physiology 

Professors Di Salvo, Mandel, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars on the physiology of the masticatory system, special sensation, oral secretory 
system, oral circulation, and their relation to dental practice. 



14 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Oral Biology 212. Oral pharmacology 

Professor Bartelstone and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars designed to provide a comprehensive pharmacologic base for dental practice. 

Oral Biology 213. Oral microbiology 

Professor Beiser and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars on the microbiologic, viral, and immunologic aspects of the oral diseases. 

OROFACIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

Statistics and Epidemiology 200. 

Professors Chabora, Applewhite, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures, seminars, fieldwork, and laboratory sessions in basic biostatistics and dental epidemiologic 
methods and techniques. A joint course of the divisions of orofacial growth and development and 
preventive dentistry and community health. 

ORTHODONTICS 

Orthodontics 341. Principles of orthodontics 

Professor Di Salvo and the staff. Third year. 

Lectures, seminars, and laboratory. Orthodontic fundamentals, with special emphasis on prevention of 
malocclusion by the early recognition and correction of the predisposing factors. Laboratory time is 
devoted to the designing and construction of fixed and removable appliances used as .space main- 
tainers. In addition, simple appliances used in tooth guidance procedures, which are considered to be 
within the province of the general practitioners of dentistry, are constructed. 

Orthodontics 342. Orthodontic clinic 

Professors Di Salvo, M. Gliedman, and R. Gliedman. Third year. 

Students obtain clinical experience in the use of appliances constructed in the laboratory. They treat 
patients with orthodontic problems which require either preventive measures or minor tooth movement. 

Orthodontics 441. Elective in orthodontics 

Professor Di Salvo and the staff. Fourth year. 

Lectures, seminars, laboratory and clinic participation. An intensive, in-depth exposure to etiology, 
diagnosis, case analysis, treatment planning, and clinical management of malocclusion. 

PATHOLOGY 

Pathology 150. General and special pathology 

Professors Blanc, Cowen. Duffy, Gambino, Godman, King, Lane, Lattes, Osser- 
man, Richart, Stoerk, Vogel, Wagner, and Wilens. First year. 

Same course as that given to medical students, including lectures, seminars, and laboratories, with 
emphasis on gross and microscopic examination of tissues, correlated with clinical findings. 

Pathology 246. Oral pathology 

Professor Blake and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures, demonstrations, conferences, and laboratory work on diseases of the jaws, teeth, and soft 
tissues about the oral cavity. Emphasis on clinical manifestations of the various diseases. 

PEDODONTICS 

Pedodontics 301. Fundamentals of pedodontics and preventive dentistry 
Professor Rosenstein. Summer II. 

Lectures on basic aspects of pedodontics and the role of pedodontics in preventive dentistry. The 
several phases of dental service for children, mean ages for various stages of normal dental growth 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 15 

and development, the significance of dental service, and areas of dental service involving preventive 
measures. Also included is preparation for the technique course: anatomical details of primary teeth 
and principles of operative procedures for the primary teeth. 

Pedodontics 302. Technique course 

Professors Nathanson and Berg and Dr. Bassett. Summer II. 

Demonstration and technique exercises in special operative procedures for compound-cavity prepara- 
tion and filling, and full-crown coverage for primary teeth on technique models using newer types of 
cutting instruments. 

Pedodontics 403. Preventive dentistry 

Professor Rosenstein. Fourth year. 

Lectures on the principles of prevention of dental and oral disease and disorders in children: dental 
caries, the common oral soft-tissue lesions, disorders of occlusion in the developing dentitions, and 
elimination of unfavorable habits involving the mouth. Constitutional and systemic factors (including 
nutrition) are included, as well as local oral factors. In each of these areas specific recommendations 
are made for elimination of unfavorable factors and clinical application of positive preventive meas- 
ures. Pertinent literature is assigned and reviewed. 

Pedodontics 404. Theory and practice of pedodontics 

Professor Rosenstein. Fourth year. 

Lectures and conferences on the factors involved in basic treatment planning for children and 
requisite background knowledge: clinical aspects of the various stages of dental development, child 
evaluation and management, purposes and essentials of pedodontic history-taking, home care, special 
operative procedures involving pulp therapy for conservation of children's teeth, management of 
traumatized teeth, and special considerations in dental care for children with handicapping conditions. 

Pedodontics 405. Pedodontics clinic 

Professor Rosenstein and the staff. Fourth year. 

Clinical practice in total management of the child patient and application of the principles and pro- 
cedures presented in the lecture courses: history-taking, prophylaxis, special operative procedures for 
prevention of premature loss of children's teeth, and appliance therapy for space management in 
developing dentitions. Application of knowledge of dental development, child development, and 
preventive dentistry is emphasized in evaluation of the child dental patient and in treatment planning. 
Assignments to the clinic for handicapped children are included. 



PERIODONTICS 

Periodontics 201. Periodontics lectures, seminars, and clinic 

Professor Gottsegen and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars in the diagnosis, etiology, and treatment of periodontal diseases. Clinical 
practice in examination and documentation of clinical findings in the periodontal patient, prophylaxis, 
subgingival scaling and root planing, teaching and motivating patients to perform personal oral 
hygiene. The fundamentals of preventive periodontics are covered. 

Periodontics 301. Periodontics lectures, seminars, and clinic 

Professor Gottsegen and the staff. Third year. 

Lectures and seminars on periodontal surgery, occlusal traumatism, selective tooth grinding, specific 
periodontal diseases and infections, systemic background factors and interrelationships, methods of 
temporary stabilization of teeth, introduction to treatment planning, and case presentation both in 
seminar and clinic. Clinical practice in subgingival curettage, simple surgical techniques, occlusal 
adjustment by selective grinding, and temporary stabilization. 

Periodontics 401. Periodontics lectures and seminars 

Professor Gottsegen and the staff. Fourth year. 

Lectures and seminars tracing the historical development of treatment methods, advanced surgical 
techniques, special therapeutic problems, fixed and permanent splinting and restorative dentistry for 
the periodontal^ involved dentition. A review of periodontal histopathology related to the clinical 
experience, treatment planning, case management, and case presentation. 



16 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Periodontics 402. Periodontics clinic 

Professor Gottsegen and the staff. Fourth year. 

A continuation of Periodontics 301. Advanced periodontal surgical techniques and the clinical manage- 
ment of more complex cases. 

Periodontics 403. Seminars and clinic 

Professor Gottsegen and the staff. Fourth year elective-honors program 

Limited to 6 students. 

Seminar subject material researched by literature review and independent critical analysis. Clinic 
experience in the diagnosis, treatment planning, and therapeutic management of complex and difficult 
cases. The objective of this honors program is to have the student achieve the didactic knowledge and 
clinical competence of the first-year postgraduate student. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

Pharmacology 250. Introduction to pharmacology 

The staff. Second year. 

Lectures on a wide variety of drugs. The effects of many of these drugs on man and lower animals 
are demonstrated in the laboratory. Emphasis on general pharmacological principles to assist the 
student in the rational use of drugs and in the evaluation of new remedies as they may be introduced. 

PHYSIOLOGY 

Physiology 150. Mammalian physiology * 

Professor Nocenti and the staff. First year. 

Lectures, conferences, demonstrations, and laboratory. The function of the various organ systems of 
the mammalian body and their interrelations. 



PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH 

Preventive Dentistry 200. Principles of preventive dentistry 

Professor Mandel and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and seminars on the etiology, histopathology, and prevention of the plaque diseases — caries 
and periodontal diseases; preventive aspects of malocclusion and oral lesions; nutrition, patient educa- 
tion, and motivation for prevention. 

Preventive Dentistry 201. Laboratory and clinical exercises 

Professors Mandel, Weinstein, Wotman, and Zengo. Second year. 

TTie techniques for studying plaque, calculus, saliva, and gingival fluid. Clinical training in fluoride 
procedures and dietary analysis. 

Preventive Dentistry and Community Health 202. 

Professors Applewhite, Dworkin, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and field exercises in education for prevention. 

Community Health 300. Social dynamics 

Professor Applewhite. Third year. 

Lectures and seminars on utilization of health facilities by groups, response of society and the indi- 
vidual to health problems, social and cultural conditions that influence disease, environment and 
ecology; the dynamics of community action and sociocultural barriers and motivating factors. 

Community Health 301. Principles of community health 

Professor Applewhite. Third year. 

Survey course in theory and practice of public health with more detailed discussion of dental public 
health, group practice, community involvement, and dental health education resources. Opportunities 
are provided for field trips and observation of dental problems and dental care in community and 
institutional settings. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 17 

Dental Auxiliary Utilization 300 and 400. 

Professor Kaplan. Third and fourth years. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and clinical practice in the efficient utilization of chairside dental auxiliaries 
under conditions simulating private practice. Operative positions for the dental team and patient, 
preplanned sequential instrumentation and treatment within the concepts of "four-handed" dental 
team operation. Equipment and operating area principles and evaluation, communication, and 
training auxiliary personnel. 

Systems of Dental Practice 400. Ethics, jurisprudence, and history of dentistry 

Professor Applewhite and the staff. Fourth year. 

Lectures as prerequisite to the proper appreciation of community dentistry. They include the broad 
obligations posed by socioeconomics, humanities, ethics, and jurisprudence, and consider the evolution 
of preventive dentistry and community health as part of the advances made in dentistry. 

Systems of Dental Practice 401. Health economics 

Professor Applewhite and the staff. Fourth year. 

The present and projected means of government, insurance, industrial, labor, and private financing 
of oral health care. The advantages and disadvantages of each method of financing oral care. 



PROSTHODONTICS 

Prosthodontics 200. Preclinical prosthodontics 

Professors Uccellani, Caronia, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and demonstrations on theory and procedures in the fabrication of fixed, removable, and 
complete prostheses. Wherever necessary for the learning of manipulative skills in preparation for 
clinical objectives, procedures are carried out on models in the laboratory by the student. Periods of 
clinical observation are an integral part of the course. 

Prosthodontics 300. Core clinical prosthodontics 

Professors Lucca, Uccellani, Caronia, and the staff. Third year. 

Lectures, demonstrations, and clinical experience in the biological principles and practice of the more 
simple cases in all phases of prosthodontics — fixed and removable partial dentures and complete 
dentures. 

Prosthodontics 400. Advanced prosthodontics 

Professors Lucca, Caronia, and the staff. Fourth year. 

Lectures, demonstrations, seminars, and advanced clinical experience in the biologic principles and 
practice of fixed and removable dentures. Lectures on different concepts of occlusion and other schools 
of thought on various aspects of prosthodontics are given by the staff and guest lecturers. 

Prosthodontics 401. Surgical prosthesis 

Professor Bruno. Fourth year. 

Lectures and technical procedures in maxillofacial and surgical prosthesis. 

PSYCHIATRY 

Psychiatry 100, 200, and 300. Human behavior 

Professor Schoenberg and the staff. First, second, and third years. 

Psychosocial aspects of patient care. Lectures, demonstrations, and seminars. 

STOMATOLOGY 

Diagnosis and Radiology 200. Diagnosis and radiology lectures 

Professor Budowsky, Dr. Donovan, and the staff. Second year. 

Lectures and discussions on history, physics, and electronics of radiology; studies on radiobiology, 
radiotherapy, radiation hazards, and protections; radiographic techniques and processing. Funda- 
mentals of radiographic interpretation; diagnosis of pulpal diseases and associated abnormalities. 



18 COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Diagnosis 201. Clinical stomatology conferences 

Professors Zegarelli, Marder, Kutscher, and the staff. Second, third, and 
fourth years. 

Required for third- and fourth-year and postdoctoral students, but second-year students and members 

of the staff are urged to attend. 

Presentation by students of case histories of patients with diseases of the mouth and jaws which are 

of diagnostic interest and importance. General discussion of each case by and with the audience is 

encouraged. 

Diagnosis 310. Clinical cancer training 

Professors Zegarelli, Kutscher, and the staff. Third year. 

Lectures and clinical experience in the diagnosis and treatment of tumors of the head, face, and 
neck. The student is rotated for one week through the otolaryngology, radiotherapy, dermatology, 
and maxillofacial prosthesis clinics. Operating room experience in the surgical management of 
tumors is included. 

Diagnosis 312. Diagnosis lectures and clinic 

Professors Zegarelli, Marder, Levine, and the staff. Third year. 

Lectures and discussions on diagnostic methods and techniques, diseases of the maxilla and mandible, 
tumors of the mouth, and diseases of the soft tissue. Clinical practice in mouth examination, history- 
taking, diagnosis of mouth and jaw diseases, and treatment-planning 

Diagnosis 413. Diagnosis clinic 

Diagnosis staff. Fourth year. 

Clinical practice in diagnostic procedures and techniques, comprehensive diagnosis including treatment- 
planning, and clinical and laboratory diagnosis of diseases of the mouth and jaws. _, 

Diagnosis 415. Diagnosis lectures 

Professor Zegarelli and the staff and guest lecturers. Fourth year. 

Lectures on focal infection; psychogenic disturbances, neurological diseases, radiation therapy, and 
diseases of the maxillary sinus. 

Radiology 367. Radiology clinic 

Professor Budowsky, Dr. Donovan, and the staff. Third year. 

Clinical practice in intraoral and extraoral radiography; demonstrations of temporomandibular joint 
panoramic and laminographic techniques. 

Oral Medicine 386. 

Professors Zegarelli, Kutscher and Marder. Third year. 

Lectures on the management and treatment of selected diseases of the mouth and jaws including 
choice of drugs, modes of administration, contraindications, and side reactions. The systemic impli- 
cations of oro-dental therapy, the dental management of systemically ill patients, and other medico- 
dental relationships is emphasized. 

SURGERY 

Surgery 200. Anesthesiology 

Professors Bartelstone, Baumstark, Katz and Schube. Second year. 

Lectures and demonstrations in local and general anesthesia and principles of sedation. 

Surgery 201. Introduction to oral surgery 

Professors Baurmash, Loscalzo, L. Mandel and Minervini. Second year. 

Lectures and demonstrations to prepare students for clinical oral surgery. 

Surgery 301. Basic oral surgery 

Professors Loscalzo, L. Mandel, Minervini, Baumstark, Baurmash, Linz and 
Terenzio. Third year. 

Lectures and demonstrations in minor oral surgery. The principles of oral surgery are considered as 
applied to the total oral surgical environment. 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 19 

Surgery 302. Clinical practice of basic oral surgery 

Professors Loscalzo, L. Mandel, Minervini, and staff. Third year. 

Clinical application of the principles of basic oral surgery. 

Surgery 403. Clinical clerkship at The Roosevelt Hospital 

Professor Linz and staff. Fourth year. 

Assignment of students to The Roosevelt Hospital supervised by the hospital dental service. 



Summary of the Program 



Because of major revisions in curriculum, the following summary reflects the 
program for the year 1971-1972. Consequently, certain course offerings may 
appear to be duplicated and others may appear to be omitted. 



FIRST YEAR (CLASS OF 1975) 



Anatomy 150 
Anatomy 151 
Anatomy 153 
Biochemistry 150 
Correlation Clinics 100 



Introduction to Dentistry 100 
Microbiology 151 and 152 
Pathology 150 
Physiology 150 
Psychiatry 100 



SECOND YEAR (CLASS OF 1974) 

Anatomy 115 

Diagnosis 201 

Diagnosis and Radiology 200 

Endodontics 232 

Introduction to Dentistry 200 

Operative Dentistry 231 

Oral Biology 200*, 201, 202, 210, 

211,212, and213 
Pathology 246 

♦Identical to Anatomy 115. 



Periodontics 201 

Pharmacology 250 

Preventive Dentistry and Community 

Health 200, 201, and 202 
Prosthodontics 200 
Psychiatry 200 

Statistics and Epidemiology 200 
Surgery 200 and 201 



THIRD YEAR (CLASS OF 1973) 

Anatomy 352 

Community Health 300 and 301 

Dental Auxiliary Utilization 300 

Dental Materials 327 

Diagnosis 201 

Diagnosis 310 

Diagnosis 312 

Endodontics 335 

Medicine 378 

Operative Dentistry 333 

Oral Medicine 386 



Orthodontics 341 
Orthodontics 342 
Pedodontics 301 and 302 
Periodontics 301 
Prosthodontics 300 
Psychiatry 300 
Radiology 367 
Surgery 301 and 302 
Systems of Dental Practice 300 
Therapeutics 386 



SUMMARY OF THE PROGRAM 21 



FOURTH YEAR (CLASS OF 1972) 



Comprehensive Case 485 Periodontics 401 and 402 

Dental Auxiliary Utilization 400 Prosthodontics 400 

Diagnosis 201 Prosthodontics 401 

Diagnosis 413 Surgery 403 

Diagnosis 415 Systems of Dental Practice 400 and 401 

Endodontics 436 Temporomandibular Joint 

Operative Dentistry 434 Disorders 484 

Pedodontics 403, 404, and 405 

Elective courses are offered in most divisions. 

REQUIRED SUMMER SESSION CLINICS 

These sessions are held during June and July for approximately eight to nine 
weeks (see page 7). 



Admission, Registration 
and Expenses 



All qualified men and women receive consideration for admission without regard 
to race, creed, color, or national origin. Candidates should apply after July 1 
during the academic year preceding that for which they seek admission, on applica- 
tion forms obtained from the Committee on Admissions, School of Dental and 
Oral Surgery, 630 West 168th Street, New York, N.Y. 10032. Each application 
must be accompanied by a check or money order for $20, made payable to Colum- 
bia University, to cover the cost of processing the application. This fee is not 
returnable and is not credited toward tuition. 

Required preparation: three full years at an acceptable college of arts and sciences, 
including the following courses (8 points of each): English composition and 
literature, physics, biology, inorganic chemistry, and organic chemistry. 

Recommended preparation: additional courses in chemistry, advanced courses in 
biology, courses in mathematics, foreign languages, sociology, history, and the 
fine and industrial arts. 

It is not necessary to complete the academic requirements before applying, but 
all requirements must be completed before registration. The admission of a stu- 
dent depends primarily on his preparation and intellectual capacity, but it also 
depends upon judgments of his character and health. Preference is given to appli- 
cants with bachelor's degrees from accredited colleges of arts and sciences. 

DENTAL APTITUDE TESTS 

All applicants must take the Dental Aptitude Tests, which are conducted by 
the Council on Dental Education at various testing centers throughout the United 
States and Canada. For further information apply directly to the Division of Edu- 
cational Measurements, Council on Dental Education of the American Dental 
Association, 211 East Chicago Avenue, Chicago, 111. 60611. 

ACCEPTANCE FEE 

Within one month after he receives notice of his acceptance, an applicant must 
notify the Committee on Admissions that he intends to enroll and must send a 
check or money order for $200 made payable to Columbia University. If he registers 
for the term to which he has been admitted, the fee will be credited toward his 
tuition; if he does not register, the fee will not be refunded. 



REGISTRATION • AUDITING COURSES • REGULATIONS 23 

COMBINED COURSES 

With Barnard College. Under the "professional option" plan, students from Bar- 
nard College may receive the Bachelor of Arts degree from Barnard after the 
completion of three years of undergraduate work and the first year in the School 
of Dental and Oral Surgery. To be eligible for this privilege, before entering the 
School the student must have completed at Barnard 90 points of academic work 
(including all specific requirements), a major of 28 points, and the major exami- 
nation or thesis. 

With the School of General Studies. Students from the School of General Studies 
may exercise the professional option after the completion of 94 points (including 
all courses prescribed for the Bachelor of Science degree), not less than 64 of 
which must have been taken at Columbia University. 



► REGISTRATION 

Before attending classes, students must register in person at the Office of the 
Registrar on September 7-8, 1971. Registration consists of filling out forms re- 
quired for University records and paying the fees. Late registration requires the 
approval of the Dean of the School and the payment of a late fee (see below). 

All students will be asked to give social security numbers when registering in 
the University. Those who do not now have a number should obtain one from 
their local social security office well in advance of registration. 



► AUDITING COURSES 

Degree candidates in good standing who are enrolled for 15 or more points in the 
current term may audit one or two courses in any division of the University without 
charge by filing a formal application in the Registrar's Office (P&S, Room 3-412) 
during the change-of-program period. Applications require (a) the certification of 
the Registrar that the student is eligible to audit and (b) the approval of the dean of 
the school in which the courses are offered. 

Elementary language courses, laboratory courses, and seminars are not open to 
auditors; other courses may be closed because of space limitations. In no case will 
an audited course appear on a student's record, nor is it possible to turn an audited 
course into a credit course by paying the fee after the fact. 



► REGULATIONS 

Each person whose registration has been completed will be considered a student 
of the University during the term for which he is registered unless his connection 
with the University is officially severed by withdrawal or otherwise. No student 
registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same time be regis- 



24 FEES 

tered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University or of any other 
institution, without the specific authorization of the dean or director of the school 
or college of the University in which he is first registered. 

The privileges of the University are not available to any student until he has com- 
pleted his registration. Since, under the University statutes, payment of fees is part 
of registration, no student's registration is complete until his fees have been paid. 
No student is permitted to attend any University course for which he is not officially 
registered unless he has been granted auditing privileges. No student may register 
after the stated period unless he obtains the written consent of the proper dean or 
director. 

ATTENDANCE AND LENGTH OF RESIDENCE 

No degree will be granted to a student who has not registered for and attended 
at the School courses of instruction equivalent to at least four academic years of 
full-time work. No advanced standing is granted. 

Students are held accountable for absences incurred owing to late enrollment. 
Any student whose religious duties conflict at any time with academic requirements 
should apply to his dean or director for an equitable solution. 

A student in good standing may, for a valid reason, be granted a leave of 
absence by the dean or director of the division of the University in which he is 
registered. 

ACADEMIC DISCIPLINE 

The continuance of each student upon the rolls of the University, the receipt by 
him of academic credits, his graduation, and the conferring of any degree or the 
granting of any certificate are strictly subject to the disciplinary powers of the Uni- 
versity. 

HONOR CODE 

Academic and intellectual integrity are accepted principles in the dental 
profession. An Honor Code, created and administered by the student body, is 
the formal acknowledgment of this understanding at the School of Dental and 
Oral Surgery. Each student is expected to abide by it. 



► FEES 

The following fees are prescribed by statute for the full program for one year for 
a candidate for the D.D.S. degree and are subject to change at any time at the 
discretion of the Trustees. Fees for a partial program are assessed by the Registrar 
as provided by the University statutes. 

Tuition $2,800.00 

Student health service fee for all full-time students, 

per academic year — (see page 26) 98.08 



FEES 



25 



APPLICATION FEES AND LATE FEES 

Application for admission 

Application for each special examination 

For renewal of application for a degree 

For late registration 

For late application, or late renewal of application, for a degree 



$20.00 

10.00 

1.00 

10.00 

10.00 



FEES FOR REPEATED COURSES 

A student who is required to repeat the work for any one year must pay the full 
tuition and fees. 

WITHDRAWAL AND ADJUSTMENT OF FEES 

A student who decides to withdraw from the University must notify the Regis- 
trar in writing at once. If he is under twenty-one years of age, his parent or guardian 
must first give consent in writing to the Registrar. He will be given an honorable 
discharge provided he is in good academic standing and not subject to discipline. 

Any adjustment of the tuition that the student has paid is reckoned from the 
date on which the Registrar receives the student's written notification. The student 
health and hospital fee, application fees, late fees, and special fees are not subject 
to rebate. Up to and including the second Saturday after the first day of classes, 
tuition will be retained in the following amount: 

Full-time study $50.00 

Part-time study 25.00 

After the second Saturday after the first day of classes in the term, the above 
amount is retained, plus an additional percentage of the remaining tuition (as 
indicated in the schedule below), for each week, or part of a week, of the term 
up to the date on which the student's written notice of withdrawal is received by 
the Registrar. 



ADJUSTMENT SCHEDULE 



Second Saturday after first day 

of classes 
Week following second Saturday 

after first day of classes 
Second following week 
Third following week 
Fourth following week 
Fifth following week 
Sixth following week 
Seventh following week 
Eighth following week 



Minimum Fees 
Retained 

$25 or $50 



25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 


25 


or 


50 



Percentage of 
Remaining Tuition Retained 





10 
20 
30 
45 
60 
75 
90 
100 (no adjustment) 



26 ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE FEE 

The student health service fee is used to pay the annual premium of the Asso- 
ciated Hospital Service of New York for hospital insurance and to pay part of the 
cost of the Student Health Service. Students who already have hospital insurance 
are not charged the cost of the premium. 

Daily office hours are held by the Student Health Service, 238 Fort Washington 
Avenue. Members of the health service are available to attend ill students if they 
live near the Medical Center. Students who require hospitalization are cared for 
either in the wards of the Medical Center or elsewhere under the terms of an insur- 
ance policy of the Associated Hospital Service of New York. 

RENEWAL OF APPLICATION FOR THE D.D.S. DEGREE 

An application for the D.D.S. degree terminates at the next regular time for the 
issuance of diplomas subsequent to the date of filing, but it may be renewed for a 
fee of $1 each time that the candidate chooses to come up for consideration. 



► ESTIMATED EXPENSES 

The approximate cost of attending the School for an academic year of nine 
months is as follows: 

Average Minimum 

Tuition and fees for a full program $2,898.08 $2,898.08 

Room in one of the residence halls 625.00 460.00 

Board in a University dining room 784.00 750.00 

The average and minimum figures for board include the approximate cost of 
meals not provided under the weekly board plans; holiday periods are not included 
(see "Housing," pages 29-30). 

In addition, each student should budget for such items as clothing, laundry and 
dry cleaning, travel, dues to organizations, amusements, and sundries. Those who 
live at home will probably spend about $200 for lunches during the year. 

BOOKS AND EQUIPMENT 

Books. The approximate cost of books will be: in the first year, $190; in the sec- 
ond year, $300; in the third year, $265; in the fourth year, $120. Book lists are 
posted for each class during registration week. Books may be purchased from the 
Medical Center Bookstore on the first floor of the College of Physicians and 
Surgeons. The store is maintained expressly for the convenience of the students 
and staff of the Medical Center schools and hospitals. 

Instruments and Supplies. Each student must buy, from the University, the origi- 
nal package outfit of instruments specified in the official instrument list. Un- 



FINANCIAL AID 27 

authorized or incomplete equipment will not be accepted by the instructors. 
The estimated cost of instruments for students entering in September 1971, will 
be approximately $3,000 over the four-year period. Arrangements have been 
made with the Bursar to spread payments evenly over the four-year period. For 
the 1971-1972 academic year, the following schedule of payments will apply: 
Entering students will pay $750 for each of the first three years and the balance 
in the fourth year. Second-year students will pay $750 for each of the second and 
third years and the balance in the fourth year. Third-year students will pay 
$1,000 for the third year and the balance in the fourth year. The only expense 
anticipated for fourth-year students will be for replacement of lost or broken in- 
struments. Variations in these figures may be necessary because of price fluctua- 
tions or new developments. Instruments must be paid for at the beginning of the 
academic year, but students who can demonstrate their need may borrow from 
the University or from the Health Professions Loan Program to defray the cost. 
These are estimates and are subject to change. Students are asked not to present 
checks made out in advance and based upon these figures. 

Microscopes. During the first and second years microscopes are provided by the 
School for an annual rental of $15. If a student prefers to provide his own micro- 
scope, he must have it approved by the Department of Anatomy. It is recom- 
mended that the microscope be of standard make equipped with: (a) quadruple 
nose piece; (b) Abbe or variable focus condenser; (c) 4x, lOx, 43x objectives; 
(d) 96x oil immersion lens; (e) lOx wide field eye piece; (/) mechanical stage; 
(g) attached lamp; (h) carrying case. The cost of a new microscope ranges from 
$460 to $700, and of a reconditioned microscope from $150 to $450. Arrange- 
ments for approval and for purchase or rental should be made before registration 
for the opening term. 

Lockers. Each entering student is assigned a locker; he must use a combination 
lock as prescribed by the School. 



► FINANCIAL AID 

Students may apply for loans and grants through the Dean's Office. Grants are 
awarded only in combination with loans; any student who can demonstrate his 
need is eligible to apply. Application forms are issued by the Dean's Office. Finan- 
cial aid programs are administered without regard to race, creed, color, national 
origin, or sex. 

Student loans are available on the basis of financial need to full-time Columbia 
degree candidates to partially cover normal educational and living expenses for the 
year in which the loan is granted. The maximum amount that a student who is a 
citizen or a permanent resident may borrow in any one year from all sources, in- 
cluding non-University programs, is $3,000. The University reserves the right to 
assign the funds from which loans are granted. Students who are United States 
citizens and residents of states having loan plans are urged to apply to these sources. 
Federal Health Professions loan funds are also available. To insure an early decision, 



28 FINANCIAL AID 

applications for all loans should be filed for the autumn term by June 1; for the 
spring term by December 1 . 

The heavy schedule of the School makes it difficult for students to undertake 
outside part-time work during the academic year. If at all possible, other financial 
arrangements should be made. 

NEW YORK STATE SCHOLAR INCENTIVE AWARDS 

Any student who has been a legal resident of New York State for the preced- 
ing year is entitled to a Scholar Incentive Award for each term in which he is 
registered as a full-time degree candidate. The amount of this award is based 
upon the net taxable balance of his income and the income of those responsible 
for his support, as reported on the New York State income tax return for the 
previous calendar year. Further information and application forms may be ob- 
tained from the Department of Education, Regents Examination and Scholarship 
Center, Albany, N.Y. 12201. Application for awards should be filed three months 
in advance of the beginning of the term for which the grant is to apply. 

AWARDS AND PRIZES 

Alpha Omega Fraternity, Newark Alumni Chapter. An award of $25 with a cer- 
tificate, presented to the most deserving student in the first-year class. 

Alpha Omega Scholarship Award. A plaque presented to the graduating student 
(not necessarily an Alpha Omegan) with the highest scholastic average for his 
four years of dental studies. First awarded in 1949. 

American Academy of Oral Medicine. A certificate and a subscription to the 
Journal of Oral Medicine, awarded to a fourth-year student for excellence in 
this field. 

American Academy of Gold Foil Operators. Certificate awarded to a fourth- 
year student for excellence in gold foil technique. 

American Academy of Dental Radiology. A certificate awarded to a fourth- 
year student for excellence in this field. 

American Academy of Feriodontology. A student award certificate and a one-year 
subscription to the journals published by The American Academy of Feriodon- 
tology, awarded to an outstanding student in periodontics. 

American Association of Orthodontists. A certificate awarded to a student show- 
ing exceptional interest and special aptitude in orthodontics. 

American College of Dentists, New York Section. An award of $100 and a 
plaque or scroll. Presented to a third-year student who is a good all-around 
student, a member of the student section of the American Dental Association, 
and who exhibits leadership. 

American Dental Society of Anesthesiology, Inc. An award certificate and a one- 



HOUSING 29 

year subscription to Anesthesia Progress, awarded to a fourth-year student who 
has shown outstanding ability or interest in the field of pain control. 

American Society of Dentistry for Children. A certificate, one year of member- 
ship in the Society, and a one-year subscription to The Journal of Dentistry for 
Children, awarded to a fourth-year student. 

William Bailey Dunning Award for Excellence in Periodontology. A medal 
awarded to the graduating student who is the most proficient in periodontology. 
First awarded in 1957. 

Ella Marie Ewell. A medal awarded to the graduating student who is the most 
proficient in some subject of dentistry. 

International College of Dentists, U.S.A., Section. A plaque presented to the 
graduating student who has shown the most professional growth and develop- 
ment during his years of dental study. 

Italian Dental Society Award. An award of $100 to a second-year student who 
has demonstrated outstanding scholarship in his first year of study. 

Vincent Petrullo Scholarship Award — Sponsored by the Italian Dental Society of 
New York. An award of $100 to a third-year student who has demonstrated 
outstanding scholarship in his second year of study. 

Prize for Excellence in Operative Dentistry. A plaque awarded by the staflf of 
the Section of Operative Dentistry to the graduating student who has shown the 
greatest proficiency in operative dentistry. 

Certificate for Excellence in Pedodontics. A plaque awarded to a graduating 
student for excellence in pedodontics. Established by the Class of 1929. 

Psi Omega Fraternity Award. A plaque presented by the Gamma Lambda Chap- 
ter to the graduating student who has displayed exemplary professional conduct. 

Rowe-Wiberg Medal. An award made by the Association of Dental Alumni to 
the graduating student who has shown the greatest proficiency in prosthetic 
dentistry. 

Women's Auxiliary to the 11th District Dental Society. An award of $150 to a 
deserving fourth-year student who is a resident of the Borough of Queens. 



► HOUSING 

The University provides limited housing for undergraduate and graduate men and 
women, both single and married. Inquiries about men's housing and the accom- 
modations for married students should be directed to the Residence Halls Office, 
125 Livingston Hall, Columbia University, New York, N.Y. 10027. Women stu- 
dents should write to the women's residence hall, Johnson Hall, 411 West 116th 



30 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Street, New York, N. Y. 10027. All rates below are approximate and may be sub- 
ject to change. 

Rates in the graduate men's residence halls range from $600 to $750 for the 
academic year. Meals are available in the University dining halls on a cash basis. 

In Johnson Hall, room rates for the academic year range from $570 to $815, 
with $700 the median rate. All residents are required to take breakfast and dinner 
at Johnson Hall five days a week, at a cost of $500 for the academic year, exclusive 
of weekends and the Christmas holidays. 

Burgess, at 542 West 112th Street, is a newly renovated, air-conditioned building 
for married graduate students. Accommodations range from efficiency apartments 
(one room plus kitchenette and bath) to two-bedroom apartments; basic furniture 
is provided. Rates range from $150 to $240 a month, including utilities. Requests 
for further information and for application forms should be directed to the Office 
of University Housing, 400 West 119th Street, New York, N.Y. 10027. 

Students who wish to live in furnished rooms or apartments off campus should 
consult the Registry of Off -Campus Accommodations, 401 West 1 17th Street, Colum- 
bia University, New York, N.Y. 10027, for information. Single rooms in private 
apartments range from $15 to $25 a week; double rooms, from $20 to $25. Most 
apartments, when available, are in the price range of $160 to $300 a month. 

International House, a privately owned student residence near the campus, has 
accommodations for about five hundred graduate students, both foreign and Ameri- 
can. Rates are $84 to $105 a month, including continental breakfast. To be eligible 
for admission a student must be at least twenty-one years old and must be registered 
for a minimum of 12 points or for a program of full-time research. Inquiries should 
be addressed to the Committee on Admissions, International House, 500 Riverside 
Drive, New York, N.Y. 10027. 



► STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

OMICRON KAPPA UPSILON 

Epsilon Epsilon chapter of Omicron Kappa Upsilon, national honorary fraternity, 
was chartered in the School of Dental and Oral Surgery in 1934. The purpose of 
the fraternity is to recognize and honor a maximum of 12 percent of the members 
of the graduating class on the basis of scholarship, character, and potential for fu- 
ture professional growth and attainments. 

THE WILLIAM JARVIE SOCIETY 

The William Jarvie Society for Dental Research is a nonsecret, dental honor 
society, membership in which is based on scholarship and interest in dental research, 
and for which second-, third-, and fourth-year students are eligible. The society was 
organized in the School of Dental and Oral Surgery in 1920 and named after Dr. 
William Jarvie because of his wide interest in the promotion of dental research. 
The society aims to promote the spirit of research among the students. 



GRADES AND PROMOTIONS • GRADUATION * LICENSURE 31 

THE STUDENT DENTAL ASSOCIATION 

The Student Dental Association of Columbia University was established in 
1960 to provide a professional and social forum in which the entire student body 
would participate. The general program of this organization is patterned after the 
program of local dental societies, in which the graduate dentist makes his con- 
tribution to the organized dental profession. The undergraduate dental student is 
exposed to the democratic process of organization function, policy development, 
and programming as he meets his responsibility for supporting the program of 
his association. 



► GRADING SYSTEM AND REQUIREMENTS FOR PROMOTION 

The following grading system is used: A, excellent; B, good; C, fair; F, failure. 

A student may be admitted to the second, third, or fourth year of the dental 
curriculum only upon the recommendation of the officers of instruction under whom 
he has studied during the preceding year. 

The School reserves the right to refuse readmission or promotion to any student 
who is believed for any reason to be unsuited to the conditions of study in the 
School. 

Students are classified for readmission or promotion under the following cate- 
gories: (1) recommended for advancement; (2) recommended for readmission to 
the same class; (3) recommended neither for advancement nor for readmission 
to the same class. 



► GRADUATION 

The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery will be awarded upon completion of the 
prescribed curriculum. Diplomas are issued at the times stated in the Academic 
Calendar. 



► LICENSE TO PRACTICE DENTISTRY IN NEW YORK STATE 

Successful performances in Parts I and II of the examinations given by the 
Council of the National Board of Dental Examiners are preliminary requirements 
for licensure in most states of the United States including New York. 

Those seeking licensure solely in New York State may take the final or clinical 
examinations offered by the Board of Dental Examiners of the State of New York. 
Successful completion of these examinations entitles the applicant to licensure, 
assuming the prerequisites of good moral character, citizenship, or declaration of 
intention of becoming a citizen, are fulfilled. For additional information request a 
copy of Handbook 10, Professional Education, from the Division of Professional 
Licensing Services, New York State Department of Education, Albany, New York 
12201. 



32 LICENSURE 

It is advisable, however, that candidates for licensure take the clinical examina- 
tions offered by the North East Regional Board of Dental Examiners, the content 
and format of which are identical to those of New York State. Successful comple- 
tion of these examinations, together with fulfillment of such minor prerequisites 
as may be required by individual states, permits licensure in the states of Connecti- 
cut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Vermont, 
and West Virginia, and the District of Columbia, as well as New York State. 

Additional information, including applications, format of examinations, and 
examination schedules is available from the North East Regional Board of Dental 
Examiners, 4645 Deane Avenue, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20019. 



officers of Instruction 



ANATOMY 

chairman: Professor Edward W. Dempsey 
Ernest W. April. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Tufts, 1961; Ph.D., Columbia, 1969 

J. Michael Bedford. Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Cambridge, 1958; M.A., Vet.M.B., M.R.C.V.S., 1958; Ph.D., London, 1965 

Philip W. Brandt. Associate Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Swarthmore, 1952; M.S., Pennsylvania, 1957; Ph.D., Columbia, 1960 

Malcolm B. Carpenter. Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Columbia, 1943; M.D., Long Island, 1947 

George W. Cooper, Jr. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Brown, 1958; Ph.D., Stanford, 1964 

Edward W. Dempsey. Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Marietta, 1932; Sc.M., Brown, 1934; Ph.D., 1937; M.A., Harvard, 1946; Sc.D., Marietta, 1954 

William G. Dilley. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., California (Berkeley), 1965; M.A., 1967; Ph.D., 1970 

Marie D. Felix. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., American, 1956; M.S., Cornell, 1961; Ph.D., 1962 

Ray C. Henrikson. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.Sc, Massachusetts, 1959; M.Sc, Brown, 1961; Ph.D., 1965 

Parish A. Jenkins, Jr. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Princeton, 1961; M.S., Yale, 1966; Ph.D., 1968 

W. Patrick Luckett. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Missouri, 1961; M.A., 1963; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 1967 

Melvin L. Moss. Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., New York University, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946; Ph.D., 1954 

Charles R. Noback. Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Cornell, 1936; M.S., New York University, 1938; Ph.D., Minnesota, 1942 

Letty Moss Salentijn. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

Tandarts, State University of Utrecht, 1967 

S. C. Shen. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.S., Yenching, 1933; Ph.D., Cambridge, 1939 

Alfonso Solimene. Assistant Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1954; M.A., Columbia, 1959; Ph.D., 1970 

ANESTHESIOLOGY 

chairman: Professor S. H. Ngai 

Ronald L. Katz. Associate Professor of Anesthesiology 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1952; M.D., Boston, 1956 



34 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Lester C. Mark. Professor of Anesthesiology 

M.D., Toronto, 1941 

S. H. Ngai. Professor of Anesthesiology 

M.B., National Central (China), 1944 
BIOCHEMISTRY 

chairman: Professor Erwin Chargaff 
Reinhold Benesch. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.Sc, Leeds, 1941; M.Sc, 1945; Ph.D., Northwestern, 1950 

Erwin Chargaflf. Professor of Biochemistry 

Ph.D., Vienna, 1928 

Max A. Eisenberg. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1938; M.S., New York University, 1941; Ph.D., Duke, 1950 

Philip Feigelson. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Queens (New York) 1947; Ph.D., Wisconsin, 1951 

Allen M. Gold. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Chicago, 1950; Ph.D., Harvard, 1955 

John D. Karkas. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Thessaloniki (Greece), 1952; Ph.D., Columbia, 1962 
Alvin I. Krasna. Professor of Biochemistry ^ 

B.A., Yeshiva, 1950; Ph.D., Columbia, 1955 

Seymour Lieberman. Professor of Biochemistry {assigned to Obstetrics and Gyn- 
ecology) 

B.S., Brooklyn, 1936; M.S., Illinois, 1937; Ph.D., Stanford, 1941 

Barbara W. Low. Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Oxford, 1942; M.A., 1946; D.Phil., 1948 

Richard W. Moyer. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., Pennsylvania State, 1962; Ph.D., California (Los Angeles), 1967 

Maurice Rapport. Professor of Biochemistry {assigned to Psychiatry) 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1940; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1946 

Lawrence E. Skogerson. Assistant Professor of Biochemistry 

B.A., Grinnell, 1964; Ph.D., Pittsburgh, 1968 

David J. Smith. Associate Professor of Biochemistry {on leave, academic year) 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1944 

David B. Sprinson Professor of Biochemistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1931; M.S., New York University, 1936; Ph.D., Columbia, 1946 

Parithychery Srinivasan. Associate Professor of Biochemistry 

B.Sc, Madras, 1946; Ph.D., 1953 

DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY 

CHAIRMAN: Professor Melvin L. Moss 

ENDODONTICS 

director: Professor Joseph M. Leavitt 

Gerald H. Besen. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Minnesota, 1947 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 35 

Howard I. Blum. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Adelphi, 1956; D.D.S., Columbia, 1960 

Murray A. Cantor. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Hofstra, 1949; D.D.S., Columbia, 1953 

Marvin N. Firdman. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1948; D.D.S., Columbia, 1952 

Fredric E. Goodman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1962 

Joseph M. Leavitt. Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Oklahoma, 1936; D.D.S., Columbia, 1940 

William Miller. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Columbia, 1929; D.D.S., 1931 

S. Abel Moreinis. Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Michigan, 1948 

Irving J. Naidorf. Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1937; D.D.S., Columbia, 1941 

Fred Rothenberg. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.M.D., Goettingen, 1935; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1937 

Howard B. Vogel. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1950 

INTERDISCIPLINARY CORRELATIONS 

DIRECTOR AND COORDINATOR OF CLINICAL EDUCATION: Professor Herbert J. Bartel- 
stone 

Herbert J. Bartelstone. Professor of Dentistry and Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945; Ph.D., 1960 

Harold M. Eiser. Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1948; M.P.H., Michigan, 1969 

Hyman D. Koch. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Pittsburgh, 1937; D.D.S., 1937 
OPERATIVE DENTISTRY 

director: Professor Edward A. Cain, Jr. 

Roy Boelstler. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1956; D.D.S., 1959 

Stanislaw H. Brzustowicz. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., St. John's, 1940; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Edward A. Cain, Jr. Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Fordham, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945 

Kenneth C. Deesen. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1948 

Herbert P. Fritz. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1933; D.D.S., Columbia, 1936 

Frank L. Mellana. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Fordham, 1956; D.D.S., Columbia, 1962 



36 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Joseph A. Pianpiano. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Fordham, 1958; D.D.S., Columbia, 1962 

Thomas W. Portway. Associate Professor of Dentistry {on leave, academic year) 

B.S., Fordham, 1950; D.D.S., Columbia, 1956 

George Rudensky. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S.. Columbia, 1958 

Steven S. Scrivani. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1948 

William H. Silverstein. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Maryland, 1937 
ORAL BIOLOGY 

director: Professor Sam M. Beiser 

Sam M. Beiser. Professor of Microbiology and Professor of Oral Biology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; Ph.D., Columbia, 1951 

Abraham Greenberg. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1931 

Melvin L. Moss. Professor of Anatomy 

B.A., New York University, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946; Ph.D., 1954 

Herbert P. Ostreicher. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1943; D.D.S., 1945 

Philip Person. Adjunct Professor of Oral Biology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1940; D.D.S., New York University, 1946; M.S., Rutgers, 1951 

Spyros Vratsanos. Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Assistant Professor of 
Oral Biology 

B.S., Athens, 1950; M.S., Adelphi, 1956; Ph.D., Fordham, 1961 
ORAL SURGERY 

directors: Professors Louis J. Loscaizo, Louis Mandel, and George A. Minervini 
Julien W. Anderson. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Howard, 1949 

Reynold J. Baumstark. Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Holy Cross, 1959; D.D.S., Columbia, 1963 

Harold D. Baurmash. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1948 

Kourken A. Daglian. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Rudolph H. Friedrich. William Carr Professor of Oral Surgery 

D.D.S., Northwestern, 1930 

Bertram Klatskin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Cornell, 1937; D.D.S., Columbia, 1941 

Louis J. Loscaizo. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

B.A,, Fordham, 1942; D.D.S., Temple, 1946 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 37 



Louis Mandel. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1943; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946 

George A. Minervini. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1942; D.D.S., 1946 

Daniel D. Schube. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 
B.A., Brooklyn, 1945; D.D.S., New York University, 1949 

Boaz M. Shattan. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1940; D.D.S., 1943 

Morton Jay Stern. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Upsala, 1949; D.D.S., Temple, 1953 

At Grasslands Hospital: 
Manuel M. Maslansky. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1928 

At Roosevelt Hospital: 
Andrew M. Linz. Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1948; M.Sc. (Dent.), 1953 

Peter B. Terenzio. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

L.L.B., Connecticut, 1940; M.H.A., Northwestern, 1950 
OROFACIAL GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

director: Professor Sidney L. Horowitz 

Theodore Adler. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1950 

Alice J. Chabora. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Cornell, 1964; M.S., 1965; Ph.D., 1967 

Sidney L. Horowitz. Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Columbia, 1942; D.D.S., New York University, 1945 

Edward C. McNulty. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Holy Cross, 1957; D.M.D., Harvard, 1962 
ORTHODONTICS 

director: Professor Nicholas A. Di Salvo 

Alfred J. Braida. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Georgetown, 1947 

Jack M. Breuer. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1946; D.D.S., 1949 

Nicholas A. Di Salvo. Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945; Ph.D., 1952 

Monroe M. Gliedman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1946; D.D.S., Columbia, 1952 

Richard Gliedman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1946; D.D.S., Columbia, 1952 



38 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

James B. Horn. Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Hofstra, 1953; D.D.S., Columbia, 1957 

Jacob I. Kaplan. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1938; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Gustave Lasoff. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1940; D.D.S., Medical College of Virginia, 1944 

Milton P. Merritt. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1955; D.D.S., 1958 

Eugene F. Murphy. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Xavier, 1953; D.D.S., St. Louis, 1957 

Henry I. Nahoum. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1940; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Armand M. Oppenheimer. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., College of the City of New York, 1926; B.S.. Columbia. 1927; D.D.S., 1929 

Bert B. Schoeneman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Alabama, 1935; D.D.S., Columbia, 1939 

Alexander B. Smith. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Walter G. Spengeman. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1938; D.D.S., 1941 

Julius Tarshis. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry > 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1949 

Edward E. Teltsch. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1932; D.D.S., Buffalo, 1936 

Russel J. Vanacek. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1954 

Cliflford L. Whitman. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Maryland, 1927 
PEDODONTICS 

DIRECTOR: Professor Solomon N. Rosenstein 

Marc Louis Berg. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1949 

Albert Green. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Temple, 1950; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1954 

Marvin B. King. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., New York University, 1954 

Seymour Koster. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1945; D.D.S., 1949 

Philip Kutner. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1944; D.D.S., Columbia, 1951 

Bernard Nathanson. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1929; D.D.S., Columbia, 1932 

Arnold Rosenberg. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1943; D.D.S., 1945 

Solomon N. Rosenstein. Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1929; D.D.S., Columbia, 1930 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 39 

Julian Schroff. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1930; D.D.S., Columbia, 1934 

William A. Verlin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1929; D.D.S., Columbia, 1931 

David H. Wolmer. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Hunter, 1955; D.D.S., Columbia, 1958 
PERIODONTICS 

director: Professor Robert Gottsegen 

Seymour Algus. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1943; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1946 

Michael Baron. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Georgetown, 1968 

Charles L. Herman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., New York University, 1952 

Frank E. Beube. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

L.D.S., D.D.S., Toronto, 1930 

Robert D. Blank. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 
D.M.D., Pennsylvania, 1965 

Herman Cantor. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1934; D.D.S., 1937 

Alvin D. Cederbaum. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.M.D., Tufts, 1939 

Neal W. Chilton. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1939; D.D.S., New York University, 1943; M.P.H., Columbia, 
1946 

Raymond Z. Darakjian. Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Fairleigh Dickinson, 1968 

P. Charles Gabriele. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1956; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1958 

Arnold M. Geiger. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1938; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1941 

Robert S. Goldman. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Temple, 1963; D.M.D., Pittsburgh, 1968 

Stephen F. Goodman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1960 

Robert Gottsegen. Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Michigan, 1939; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Leonard Hirschfeld. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1941; D.D.S., 1944 

Ellen N. Hosiosky. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.M.D., Basle, 1935; D.H., Guggenheim Dental Clinic, 1939; D.D.S., Columbia, 1947 

Raymond F. Johnson. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1952 

Irving A. Karel. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1956 



40 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Burton Langer. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 
B.S., Tufts, I960; D.M.D., 1964; M.Sc.D., Boston University, 1966 

Walter I. Lipow. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1961 

David M. Monahan. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., St. Louis University, 1963 

Melvin L. Morris. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1934; M.A., Columbia, 1937; D.D.S., 1941 

Bernard S. Moskow. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1954; M.Sc.D., Pennsylvania, 1958 

Ronald B. Odrich. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Queens (New York), 1958; D.D.S., Columbia, 1959 

Herbert I. Oshrain. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1938; D.D.S., New York University, 1942 

Morton C. Rennert. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1955; D.D.S., 1958 

Marvin V. Rubin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 
D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1945 

Albert Salkind. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Marquette, 1943 

Michael B. Savin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry * 

B.A., Rochester, 1961; D.M.D., Pennsylvania, 1965 

Murray Schwartz. Associate Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1950; D.D.S., Columbia, 1953 

Marvin Solomon. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B. Chem. Eng., College of the City of New York, 1960; D.D.S., Fairleigh Dickinson, 1965 

Marvin Spodek. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 
B.S., Brooklyn College, 1952; D.D.S., Columbia, 1956 

Stephen D. Stein. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1962; D.D.S., 1966 

Bernard H. Wasserman. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1944 

PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY AND COMMUNITY HEALTH 

DIRECTOR: Professor Irwin D. Mandel 

Harold L. Applewhite. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Howard, 1948; M.P.H., Columbia, 1967 

Lillian H. Bachman. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Queens (New York); 1959; D.D.S., Columbia, 1963; M.A., 1967 

Samuel F. Dworkin. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1954; D.D S., New York University, 1958; Ph.D., 1969 

Daniel H. Fine. Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Queens (New York), 1961; D.M.D., Pennsylvania, 1965 

Morton A. Fisher. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Western Reserve, 1943; D.D.S., 1944; M.P.H., Columbia, 1957; B.A., Brooklyn, 1958 

David Kaplan. Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1958; D.D.S., New York University, 1960 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 41 



Irwin D. Mandel. Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945 

George L. O'Grady. Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Fordham, 1929; D.D.S., Columbia 1934 

Milton Potters. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1944; B.A., Rutgers, 1951 

Kenneth L. Siegel. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Dartmouth, 1960; D.D.S., Columbia, 1964 

David A. Soricelli. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1955; M.P.H., Harvard, 1958 

Ephraim Weinstein. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1959 

Stephen Wotman. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1956 

Albert Zengo. Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Tufts, 1959; D.D.S., Columbia, 1964 



PROSTHODONTICS 

director: Professor John J. Lucca 

Jacob Abelson. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945 

Howard A. Arden. Associate Professor of Dentistry 
Herbert D. Ayers. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1929; D.D.S., 1931 

Henry Barnaby, Jr. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1961 

Victor S. Caronia. Associate Professor of Dentistry {on leave, academic year) 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1957 

Joseph A. De Julia. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Pittsburgh, 1951; D.D.S., Columbia, 1962 

Joseph C. De Lisi. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1952 

Gustav T. Durrer. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

Dr. Med. Dent., Berne, 1937; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1940 

Gerald M. Galvin. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., St. John's (Brooklyn), 1952; D.D.S., Columbia, 1956 

Joel Goldin. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Amherst, 1959; D.M.D., Harvard, 1963 

George W. Hindels. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

M.D., Vienna, 1938; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Arnold S. Jutkowitz. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.M.D., Pennsylvania, 1966 

John J. Lucca. Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1941; D.D.S., Columbia, 1947 



42 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

William J. Miller. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1940; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

William Raebeck, Jr. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Colgate, 1948; D.D.S., Columbia, 1947 

Louis I. Rubins. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Queens (New York), 1956; D.D.S., Columbia, 1960 

John M. Scarola. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Fordham, 1956; D.D.S., Columbia, 1960 

Peter H. Strife, II. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Middlebury, 1959; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1959 

Ennio L. Uccellani. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1946; D.D.S., Columbia, 1948 

Maxwell Widrow. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Temple, 1940 

At Grasslands Hospital: 
Morris Eckhaus. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1936 

Max P. Fishberg. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1941; D.D.S., New York University, 1944 

Robert E. Herlands. Adjunct Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1941; D.D.S., 1944 

PSYCHIATRIC DENTAL SERVICE 

director: Professor Austin H. Kutscher 

Martin Bassiur. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1964; D.D.S., 1968 

Gary D. Gross. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Cornell, 1962; D.D.S., New York University, 1966 

Herman S. Harris. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., New York University, 1929 

Austin H. Kutscher. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1945; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946 

Harold P. Rose. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.M.D., Tufts, 1937 

Arthur Shain. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1935; D.D.S., Dalhousie, 1939 

Ann R. Turkel. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Barnard, 1947; M.D., Albany Medical College, 1952 

Jay Weiss. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Harvard, 1948; D.M.D , Tufts, 1952 
STOMATOLOGY 

director: Professor Edward V. Zegarelli 

Martin I. Ames. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1945; D.D.S., 1949 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 43 



Jack Budowsky. Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Robert E. Crowley. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., New York University, 1936; D.D.S., 1939 

Joseph A. Cuttita. Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Fordham, 1932; M.S., 1935; D.D.S., Columbia, 1939 

John V. Donovan. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Wagner, 1963; D.D.S., Columbia, 1967 

Frances R. Karlan. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1949 

Mortimer Karmiol. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1939; D.D.S., Columbia, 1943 

Paul Kornfeld. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Alfred, 1941; D.D.S., Buffalo, 1944 

Austin H. Kutscher. Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., New York University, 1945; D.D.S., Columbia, 1946 

Laurence J. Levine. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1968 

John K. Lind. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., St. John's, 1951; D.D.S., Columbia, 1957 

Michael Z. Marder. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1963 

Robert N. Schiff. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1955; D.D.S., 1956 

Diane Stern. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Hunter, 1958; D.D.S., Columbia, 1961 

Robert Umans. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., New York University, 1939 

Robert F. Walsh. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Columbia, 1947 

Edward V. Zegarelli. Edwin S. Robinson Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Columbia, 1934; D.D.S., 1937; M.S., Chicago, 1943 

Edward Zerden. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Michigan, 1941; D.D.S., New York University, 1945 

Section of Special Dental Services 

Morton S. Brod. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 
B.A., Adelphi, 1951; D.D.S., Columbia, 1955 

Sebastian A. Bruno. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

D.M.D., Tufts, 1948 

Alvin J. Grayson. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

D.D.S., Indiana, 1952 

Eugene P. LaSota. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Hofstra, 1957; D.D.S., Columbia, 1961 



44 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Joseph Luban. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1938; D.D.S., Columbia, 1942 

Joseph J. Marbach. Adjunct Associate Professor of Dentistry 

B.A., Drew, 1956; D.D.S., Pennsylvania, 1960 

Philip J. Santora, Jr. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 

B.S., Cincinnati, 1962; D.M.D., New Jersey College of Dentistry, 1966 

David Zeisler. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Dentistry 
B.S., College of the City of New York, 1930; D.D.S., Columbia, 1934 

DERMATOLOGY 

chairman: Professor Carl T. Nelson 

Carl T. Nelson. Professor of Dermatology 

B.A., Harvard, 1935; M.A., 1937; M.D., 1941 

Saul L. Sanders. Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

B.A., Kenyon, 1950; M.D., Cornell, 1954 

Meyer H. Slatkin. Assistant Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1935; M.D., Edinburgh, 1940 

Richard A. Walzer. Associate Clinical Professor of Dermatology 

B.A., Harvard, 1952; M.D., Columbia, 1956 
MEDICINE 

chairman: Professor Charles A. Ragan 

Henry Aranow, Jr. Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Harvard, 1935; M.D., Columbia, 1938 

Leslie Baer. Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Wisconsin, 1959; M.D., Columbia, 1963 

Stuart W. CosgrifT. Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Holy Cross, 1938; M.D., Columbia, 1942 

David J. Gocke. Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., St. Vincent's, 1954; M.D., Pennsylvania, 1958 

Wendell B. Hatfield. Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Columbia, 1953; M.D., 1956 

Donald A. Holub. Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Columbia, 1949; M.D., 1952 

George A. Hyman. Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Columbia, 1942; M.D., 1945 

Edgar Leifer. Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1937; M.A., Columbia, 1939; Ph.D., 1941; M.D., 1946 

Jane H. Morse. Assistant Professor of Medicine 

B.A., Smith, 1951; M.D., Columbia, 1955 

Hans W. Neuberg. Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Wagner, 1941; M.D., Columbia, 1950 

Hymie L. Nossel. Associate Professor of Medicine 

M.B., Ch.B., Cape Town, 1953; Ph.D., Oxon, 1962 

Kermit L. Pines. Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine 

B.A., Columbia, 1937; M.D., 1942 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 45 

MICROBIOLOGY 

chairman: Professor Harry M. Rose 

Sam M. Beiser. Professor of Microbiology and Professor of Oral Biology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; Ph.D., Columbia, 1951 

Joe E. Coward. Assistant Professor of Microbiology 

B.S.E., State College of Arkansas, 1959; M.S., Arkansas, 1962; Ph.D., Mississippi School of Medicine, 
1968 

Paul D. Ellner. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Long Island, 1949; M.S., Southern California, 1952; Ph.D., Maryland, 1956 

Bernard F. Erlanger. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1943; M.A., New York University, 1949; Ph.D., Columbia, 
1951 

Gabriel C. Godman. Professor of Microbiology and Pathology 

B.A., New York University, 1941; M.D., 1944 

Donald H. Harter. Associate Professor of Neurology 

B.A., Pennsylvania, 1953; M.D., Columbia, 1957 

Calderon Howe. Professor of Microbiology 

B.A., Yale, 1938; M.D., Harvard, 1942 

Elvin A. Kabat. Professor of Microbiology and Human Genetics and Development 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1932; M.A., Columbia, 1934; Ph.D., 1937 

Wladislaw Manski. Associate Professor of Microbiology 

M.Phil., Warsaw, 1939; D.Sc, Wroclaw, 1951 

Councilman Morgan. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., Harvard, 1943; M.D., Columbia, 1946 

Harry M. Rose. John E. Borne Professor of Medical and Surgical Research 

B.A., Yale, 1928; M.D., Cornell, 1932 

Herbert Rosenkranz. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1954; Ph.D., Cornell, 1959 

Stuart W. Tanenbaum. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1944; Ph.D., Columbia, 1951 

Spyros M. Vratsanos. Assistant Professor of Microbiology and Assistant Professor 
of Oral Biology 

B.S., Athens, 1950; M.S., Adelphi, 1956; Ph.D., Fordham, 1961 
PATHOLOGY 

chairman: Professor Donald West King 

Giles G. Allard. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Laval (Canada), 1950 

Lucretia Allen. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., New York University, 1948; M.D., S.U.N.Y., 1952 

Irwin Almenoff. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1948; M.D., Cornell, 1952 

Henry A. Azar. Associate Professor of Pathology 

B.A., American (Lebanon), 1948; M.D., 1952 

Ernest Baden. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.A., Sorbonne, 1946; D.D.S., New York University, 1950; M.D., Geneva, 1963 



46 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Daniel Benninghoff. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Yale, 1949; M.D., Columbia, 1953 

William Bernhard. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Wisconsin, 1927; M.D., Pennsylvania, 1931 

Melvin N. Blake. Associate Clinical Professor of Oral Pathology 

D.D.S., New York University, 1955 

William A. Blanc. Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Geneva, 1940; M.D., 1947; Ph.D., 1952 

Donald E. Brown. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Harvard, 1943 

John M. Budinger. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Northwestern, 1950; M.D., 1954 

David Cowen. Professor of Neuropathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1928; M.D., 1936 

Richard Defendini. Assistant Professor of Neuropathology 

B.A., Michigan, 1948; M.A., 1951; M.D., Rochester, 1961 

Arline D. Deitch. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Brooklyn College, 1944; M.A., Columbia, 1946; Ph.D., 1954 

Philip Duffy. Professor of Neuropathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1943; M.D., 1947 

Stefan E. Epstein. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology , 

B.A., Columbia, 1956; M.D., State University of New York, 1960 

Mehdi Farhangi. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Teheran Medical School, 1957 

Joshua A. Fierer. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Alfred, 1959; M.D., State University of New York, 1963 

Vincent J. Freda. Assistant Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology 

B.A., Columbia, 1948; M.D., New York University, 1952 

S. Raymond Gambino. Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Antioch, 1948; M.D., Rochester, 1952 

Lester M. Geller. Assistant Professor of Neuropathology 

B.A., Cornell, 1947; M.A., Michigan State, 1948; Ph.D., New York University, 1953 

Gabriel Godman. Professor of Pathology 

B.A., New York University, 1941; M.D., 1944 

Reba M. Goodman. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Indiana, 1949; Ph.D., Columbia, 1955 

John G. Gorman. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.B., B.S., Melbourne, 1953 

Liselotte Graf. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Vienna, 1937 

Ross M. Grey. Associate Professor of Pathology 

D.V.M., Alabama Polytechnical Institute, 1945 

Elliott M. Gross. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1955; M.D., New York University, 1959 

Stanley Gross. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., New York University, 1936; M.D., 1939 

Don V. Hellerman. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Springfield College, 1957; M.D., New York Medical College, 1961 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 47 

Victor D. Herbert. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Columbia, 1948; M.D., 1952 

Robert L. Hirsch. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Cornell, 1947; M.D., 1951 

Harry L. loachim. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Bucharest, 1949 

Austin D. Johnston. Associate Professor of Pathology (assigned to Orthopedic 
Surgery) 

B.A., Columbia, 1945; M.D., 1947 

Julian I. Joseph. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., New York University, 1955 

Mavis Kaufman. Associate Professor of Neuropathology (assigned to Psychiatry) 

M.D., New York Medical College, 1944 

Hans Kaunitz. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Vienna, 1930 

Gordon I. Kaye. Associate Professor of Surgery 

B.A., Columbia, 1955; M.A., 1957; Ph.D., 1961 

Mary Elizabeth King. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Smith, 1947; M.D., Columbia, 1951 

Janis V. Klavins. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Kiehl (Germany), 1948 

Nathan Lane. Professor of Surgical Pathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1943; M.D., 1945 

Raffaele Lattes. Professor of Surgical Pathology 

M.D., Turin, 1933; Med.Sc.D.. Columbia, 1946 

Robert W. Leader. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Washington State, 1952; D.V.M., 1952, M.S., 1955 

William L. McLellan. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Boston, 1951; M.A., 1954; Ph.D., 1957 

Hiroshi Nakazawa. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Keio (Japan), 1958 

Elliott F. Osserman. Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1945; M.D., 1947 

M. Richard Pachter. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Zurich, 1956 

Robert Pascal. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1958; M.D., 1962 

Karl H. Perzin. Assistant Professor of Surgical Pathology 

B.A., Columbia, 1954; M.D., 1958 

William Pollack. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.Sc, London, 1948; M.Sc, 1950; Ph.D., Rutgers, 1964 

Ralph M. Richart. Professor of Pathology (assigned to Obstetrics & Gynecology) 

B.A., Johns Hopkins, 1954; M.D., Rochester, 1958 

Leon Roizin. Professor of Neuropathology (assigned to Psychiatry) 

B.A., State Lyceum (Bessarabia), 1930; M.D., Royal University (Milan), 1936 

Sarkis S. Sarkisian. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., IlUnois, 1942 



48 OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 

Henry G. Schriever. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Vermont, 1956; M.D., New York Medical College, 1960 

Paul p. Sher. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Hobart, 1961; M.D.. Washington University (St. Louis), 1965 

Stanley S. Simbonis. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Yale, 1953; M.D., 1957 

Ralph Wood Snyder. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 
B.S., McGill, 1951; M.D.C.M., 1953 

Harold J. Sobel. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Brooklyn, 1950; Chicago Medical School, 1954 

Sheldon C. Sommers. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Harvard, 1941 

David Spain. Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Maryland, 1932; M.D., 1936 

Herbert Stoerk. Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Vienna, 1938 

Harry H. Stumpf. Associate Professor of Pathology 

B.A., New York University, 1947; M.D., State University of New York, 1951 
Richard L. Swarm. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Washington (St. Louis), 1949; M.D., 1950 

Myron Tannenbaum. Associate Professor of Pathology (assigned to U'rology) 

B.S., New York University, 1952; M.S., 1955; Ph.D., 1957; M.D., Chicago, 1961 

Virginia Tennyson. Associate Professor of Neuropathology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State, 1946; M.S., Baylor, 1956; Ph.D., Columbia, 1960 

John A. Terzakis. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 
M.D., New York University, 1961 

Myron E. Tracht. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Princeton, 1948; M.S., Chicago, 1954; M.D., 1955 

John L. Tullis. Associate Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.A., Yale, 1933; M.D., Columbia, 1938 

Henry J. Vogel. Professor of Microbiology 

B.S., London, 1939; M.S., New York University, 1941; Ph.D., 1949 

Ruth H. Vogel. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

Ph.D., New York University, 1948 

Bernard M. Wagner. Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Hahnemann, 1949 

H. Joachim Wigger. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Hamburg, 1954 

Sigmund Wilens. Professor of Pathology 

Ph.D., Yale, 1926; M.D., 1929 

George Wilner. Assistant Professor of Pathology 

B.S., Northwestern, 1962; M.D., 1965 

Marianne Wolff. Associate Professor of Surgery 

B.A., Hunter, 1948; M.D., Columbia, 1952 

Kaity Yannopoulos. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

M.D., Thessaloniki (Greece), 1954 

Frederick T. Zugibe. Assistant Clinical Professor of Pathology 

B.S., St. Francis (Brooklyn), 1951; M.S., Chicago, 1959; Ph.D., 1960; M.D., West Virginia, 1968 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 49 

PHARMACOLOGY 

chairman: Professor Brian F. Hoffman 

Herbert J. Bartelstone. Professor of Dentistry and Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1942; D.D.S., Columbia, 1945; Ph.D., 1960 

Arthur L. Bassett. Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1955; Ph.D., State University of New York, Downstate 
Medical Center, 1966 

Marvin R. Blumenthal. Adjunct Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Michigan, 1946; M.D., Columbia, 1949 

Paul F. Cranefield. Adjunct Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

Ph.B., Wisconsin, 1946; Ph.D., 1951; M.D., Albert Einstein, 1964 

Lowell M. Greenbaum. Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1949; Ph.D., Tufts, 1953 

Brian F. Hoffman. David Hosack Professor of Pharmacology 

B.A., Princeton, 1943; M.D., Long Island, 1947 

Frederick G. Hofmann. Professor of Pharmacology 

B.A., Michigan, 1943; Ph.D., Harvard, 1952 

Norman Kahn. Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

B.A., Columbia, 1954; D.D.S., 1958; Ph.D., 1964 

Howard Sachs. Adjunct Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Brooklyn, 1949; M.A., Columbia, 1950; Ph.D., 1953 

Wilbur H. Sawyer. Professor of Pharmacology 

B.A., Harvard, 1942; M.D., 1945; Ph.D., 1950 

Jurg A. Schneider. Adjunct Associate Professor of Pharmacology 

M.D., Berne, 1945 

Hsueh-Hwa Wang. Assistant Professor of Pharmacology 

M.D., National Central University Medical School (China), 1946 

Shih-Chun Wang. Professor of Pharmacology 

B.S., Yenching, 1931; M.D., Peiping Union Medical College (China), 1935; Ph.D., Northwestern 1940 
PHYSIOLOGY 

CHAIRMAN: Professor John V. Taggart 

Martin Blank. Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., College of the City of New York, 1954; Ph.D., Columbia, 1957; Ph.D., Cambridge, 1959 

John Britten. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Yale, 1954; M.D., Columbia, 1958 

Shu Chien. Professor of Physiology 

M.B., National Taiwan, 1954; Ph.D., Columbia, 1957 

Louis J. Cizek. Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Fordham, 1937; M.D,, Columbia, 1941 

LeRoy L. Costantin. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.A., Columbia, 1955; M.D., 1959 

Raimond Emmers. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.A., East Texas Baptist, 1953; M.A., North Carolina, 1955; Ph.D., Syracuse, 1958 

Arthur Karlin. Associate Professor of Physiology (assigned to Neurology) 

B.A., Swarthmore, 1957; Ph.D., Rockefeller Institute, 1962 



50 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION 



Richard C. Mason. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

B.A., Indiana, 1948; Ph.D., 1952 

William L. Nastuk. Professor of Physiology 

B.S., Rutgers, 1939; Ph.D., 1945 

Mere Nocenti. Associate Professor of Physiology 

B.A., West Virginia, 1951; M.S., 1952; Ph.D., Rutgers, 1955 

David Schachter. Professor of Physiology 

B.S., New York University. 1946; M.D., 1949 

John V. Taggart. Professor of Physiology 

M.D., Southern California, 1940 

Shunichi Usami. Assistant Professor of Physiology 

M.B., Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 1949; Ph.D., 1957 

Paul Witkovsky. Assistant Professor of Physiology (assigned to Ophthalmology) 

B.A., California (Los Angeles), 1958; M.A., 1960; Ph.D., 1962 
PSYCHIATRY 

chairman: Professor Lawrence C. Kolb 

James P. Cattell. Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 

M.D., Harvard, 1942 > 

Lawrence C. Kolb. Professor of Psychiatry 

M.D., Johns Hopkins, 1934 

Bernard Schoenberg. Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatry 

M.D., Columbia, 1954 



ASSOCIATES 

Robert H. Heissenbuttel, M.D. 

(Medicine) 
Paul K. Johnson, M.D. 

(Medicine) 
Daniel Justman, M.D. 

(Psychiatry) 
Terrence T. Kuske, M.D. 

(Medicine) 
Doris J. Mitchell, D.V.M. 

(Pathology) 

RESEARCH ASSOCIATES 

Solomon L. Katz, D.D.S. 
Samuel M. Ross, B.E.E. 

(Pharmacology) 
Herbert F. Silvers, D.D.S. 
Irwin Steuer, D.D.S. 

INSTRUCTORS 

Henry Barnaby, Jr., D.D.S. 
Earle R. Bassett, D.D.S. 



INSTRUCTORS (continued) 
Erlinda Benedicto, D.M.D. 
Bernard H. Benkel, D.D.S. 
Frederick Berlin, D.D.S. 
Paul R. Bjorklund, D.D.S. 
Abraham Blechman, D.D.S. 
Ralph S. Blume, M.D. 

(Medicine) 
Belinda Bransilver, M.D. 

(Pathology) 
Robert S. Breakstone, D.D.S. 
Ronald F. Bryant, D.D.S. 
S. Gerald Cardinale, D.D.S. 
Anthony L. DiMango, D.D.S. 
Francis J. Faggella, D.D.S. 
David S. Gottlieb, D.M.D. 
Edward Greenfield, D.D.S. 
Martin Handlers, D.D.S. 
Robert J. Huettner, D.D.S. 
Robert M. Hunt, Jr., Ph.D. 

(Anatomy) 



OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION • PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL DENTAL SERVICE 



51 



INSTRUCTORS (continued) 

Robert L. Jacobson, D.D.S. 
Joseph E. Kafer, D.M.D. 
Neal L. Kaplan, D.D.S. 
George Kiriakopoulos, D.D.S. 
Eugene M. Levine, D.M.D. 
Arnold L. Lisio, M.D. 

(Medicine) 
Peter C. Lombardo, M.D. 

(Dermatology) 
Bernard Luftig, D.D.S. 
Daniel L. Macken, M.D. 

(Medicine) 
Robert Miner, D.D.S. 
Ralph K. Neuhaus, D.D.S. 
Frank W. Pandolfo, D.D.S. 
Sherman Pessin, D.D.S. 
Norbert Ripp, D.D.S. 
Charles A. Rogers, D.D.S. 
Michael J. Shulman, D.M.D. 
Ronald N. Singerman, D.M.D. 
Charles S. Solomon, D.D.S. 



INSTRUCTORS (continued) 
William Steibel, D.D.S. 
William H. Suskin, D.M.D. 
Nicholas A. Vero 
George D. Wilner, M.D. 
(Pathology) 

ASSISTANTS 

Jerome Bartwink, D.D.S. 
Lawrence W. Bergmann, D.D.S. 
Martin J. Fields, D.D.S. 

LECTURERS 

Jerry L. Adelson, D.D.S. 
Harry G. Barrer, D.D.S. 
James W. Benfield, D.D.S. 
Robert M. Cole, D.D.S. 
Robert L. Fisher, D.D.S. 
Harry A. Galton, D.D.S. 
Lawrence R. Gurin, D.D.S. 
George F. Lindig, D.D.S. 
George V. Lyons, D.D.S. 
Saul Misheloflf, D.D.S. 



PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL DENTAL SERVICE 



director: Melvin L. Moss 

consultant: Gilbert P. Smith 

DIAGNOSTIC service: Edward V. Zegarelli, attending dental surgeon; Joseph A. 
Cuttita, associate attending dental surgeon; Jack Budowsky and Austin H. 
Kutscher, assistant attending dental surgeons 

ORAL SURGERY SERVICE: Kourkcn A. Daglian and Boaz Shattan, assistant attending 
dental surgeons 

PEDODONTic service: Solomon N. Rosenstein, attending dental surgeon 

PERIODONTIC service: Robert Gottsegen, attending dental surgeon 

restorative dental service: George L. O'Grady, attending dental surgeon; 
Sebastian A. Bruno and Sidney L. Horowitz, assistant attending dental surgeons 



Academic Calendar, 1971-1972 

Sept 7-8 Tuesday-Wednesday. Registration, including payment of fees. 

13 Monday. Classes begin. 

Nov 2 Tuesday. Election Day. Holiday. 

24 Wednesday. First trimester ends for third and fourth years. 
25—27 Thursday— Saturday. Thanksgiving holidays. 

29 Monday. Second trimester begins for third and fourth years. 

Dec 18 Saturday, through January 2, 1972, Sunday. Christmas holidays. 

Feb 18 Friday. First semester ends for first-year class. 

19-27 Saturday-Sunday. Intersession. No classes for first year. 

21 Monday. Washington's Birthday. Holiday. 

25 Friday. Second trimester ends for third and fourth years. 

28 Monday. Second semester begins for first-year class. Third tri- 
mester begins for third and fourth years. 

Mar 1 Wednesday. Last day to apply or reapply for all degrees and certifi- 

cates to be awarded in June. Later filing of application requires 
payment of a late fee. 

25 Saturday, through April 2, Sunday. Spring holidays. 

May 19 Friday. Third trimester ends for fourth-year class. 

22-26 Monday-Friday. Final examinations for third-year class. 

29 Monday. Memorial Day. Holiday. 

June 6 Tuesday. Conferring of degrees and certificates. 

9 Friday. Second semester ends for first-year class. 

12-16 Monday-Friday. Final examinations for first-year class. 

12 Monday, through August 4, Friday. Summer Session for second- 

and third-year classes. 

July 4 Tuesday. Independence Day. Holiday. 



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 




1. BARD HALL 

2. N.Y. STATE PSYCHIATRIC INSTITUTE 
PSYCHOANALYTIC CLINIC 

3. NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE OF NEW YORK 

4. MAXWELL HALL 

5. HARKNESS MEMORIAL HALL 

6. DANA W. ATCHLEY PAVILION 

7. GEORGIAN NURSES RESIDENCE 

8. WILLIAM BLACK MEDICAL 

RESEARCH BUILDING 

9. ALUMNI AUDITORIUM 

10. COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS & SURGEONS 

11. VANDERBILT CLINIC 

SCHOOL OF DENTAL AND ORAL SURGERY 
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH 
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH AND 

ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICINE 
WASHINGTON HEIGHTS HEALTH 

CENTER. N.Y.C. 



12. 



13. HARKNESS PAVILION 

14. PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL 
N.Y. ORTHOPEDIC HOSPITAL 
SLOANE HOSPITAL 
SQUIER UROLOGICAL CLINIC 

15. BABIES HOSPITAL 

16. RADIOTHERAPY CENTER 

17. PAULINE A. HARTFORD MEMORIAL 

CHAPEL 

18. BABIES HOSPITAL RESEARCH, 

TEACHING, AND OFFICE 
ADDITION 

19. INSTITUTE OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

ADDITION 

20. INSTITUTE OF OPHTHALMOLOGY 

21. CENTRAL SERVICE BUILDING 

22. FRANCIS DELAFIELD HOSPITAL, 

N.Y.C. 



To Reach the Medical Center: By subway, the Washington Heights Express of the 
IND Eighth Avenue or the Van Cortland Park train of the IRT Seventh Avenue. 
By bus. Fifth Avenue Bus #4 or #5. By car, the Westside Highway exit at the 
George Washington Bridge. Parking facihties are available at West 164th Street 
and Fort Washington Avenue. 



m 



To Columbia Students 



THIS BULLETIN IS FOR YOUR USE AS A 
SOURCE OF CONTIhfUING REFERENCE. 
PLEASE SAVE IT. REPLACEMENT COPIES 
CAUSE EXPENDITURES WHICH SHOULD 
MORE DIRECTLY SERVE YOUR EDUCATION, 




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